Young Girl Loses Eye Sight After Buying Colored Contact Lenses

By JasmineHughes

After falling asleep with a pair of colored contacts, purchased at a local beauty store, a Queens girl has been hospitalized and doctors say she needs a cornea transplant.

Erica Barnes, just 14-years-old, bought a pair of hazel colored contact lenses from a store on Jamaica Avenue in New York for just twenty dollars.  Because of her cheap purchase, she was not given the proper instruction on how to take care of the contacts or her eyes, reporting that she was told she could simply use tap water to clean them. Unbeknownst to many, under federal law, contacts must be sold with a prescription from a licensed doctor. For reasons made obvious in this case, any other sale is illegal.

“They are dangerous eye candy that our children can buy anywhere,” warned Erica’s step-mother, Trina Swain.

The market for these illegal contacts is huge and little is being done to educate people, both young and old, about the dangers of them. “I see three to four cases a week of infections. Women are just doing it for the sake of beauty and to look better. They end up almost losing their sight,” said Dr. Jules Winokur, a corneal specialist on the Upper East Side. “There needs to be proper fitting and proper instruction on how to store them,” Winokur suggests.

 

  • nicole32

    Tthey sould just take contacts off the market at stores.

    • Samdromeda

      I agree.

  • Blackfootlion

    It’s so important that we teach our children that they are beautiful as they are. They idolize altered images they see on television and envision being other than themselves. Beyonce and Rihana are natural beauties yet have a litany of make-over artists that straighten their hair and color it blonde, change their eyes with contacts and even lighten their complexion. We need to reinforce the mantra “Young, Gifted and Black.” If we don’t then who will? I hope that young Erica will grow from this experience.

    • wow

      rihanna eyes are natural green and beyonces are natural light brown

      • Lola Falana

        It has nothing to do with being black. In our society, we
        always want what we don’t have. If you have straight hair, you want curly hair,
        brown eyed people want blue eyes. Flat chested people want implants, etc
         

        • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

           Absolutely disagree. We live in a white supremacy society that has ALWAYS uplifted white beauty standards and degraded black beauty, from hair, to skin, to eye color and features.

          Of course this young black female can’t help but be brainwashed against her own natural black beauty. She NEVER sees her reflection on the TV screen. If a black female is dark, she is immediately cast as unattractive and undesirable

          and it is time for us — black men — to flip that script and start uplifting our OWN brown and dark skinned women and girls.

          • SapphiresMomma

            “She NEVER sees her reflection on the TV screen.”

            Huh!  That is all you see on TV, white folks and black folks! We are on magazine covers, TV shows, commercials,  runways, major motion pictures, bill board ads! We are all over the place!  How in the world could this young woman NEVER see her reflection on TV?

            That is a crock of crap, and we need to stop the nonesense.

            ” If a black female is dark, she is immediately cast as unattractive and undesirable ”

            And,  sorry to say that attitude comes mostly from our own,  not others.

            “and it is time for us — black men — to flip that script and start uplifting our OWN brown and dark skinned women and girls.”

            Where have you been? Black men have always uplifted their own. The percentage of black men with white/other women is still very low, perhaps 2-3%. Black men are mostly with black women!

          • Ebonylove

            Sorry SapphiresMomma…

            I must agree with Blackfootlion.  Too often we are not supported by our black men as evidenced in several ways (single mothers, fatherless children, men living off women, etc). We are put down time and time again… not only by whites and the media, but also by our own men – and there are several documentaries and articles out there to support this fact. 

            I’m certainly not saying there are no good black men out there… I love black men with everything in me; but I’m not nieve enough to believe that they don’t have anything to do wit the way we view ourselves and others.

          • SapphiresMomma

            You have every right to agree or disagree with whom-ever you want. This is what “discussion” is all about.

            However, I still hold that black men are mostly with black women, and it is mostly US who seem to have negative issues about ourselves.

            Re-read my post and then THINK about it.

          • Samdromeda

            I think the issue is not being able, post diaspora, to categorically standardize just what a black person is. Many tribes are poured into people of color. We have much rage and distrust between the sexes. Where love me means let me rule you. I have met too many sisters who think this way and they are not even aware of it. Two rulers will always be at war until one submits. That is not a good way to enter a marriage. This will spill over to harm the children. What is a father and what is a mother?

          • Black&naturallybeautiful

            I agree Ebonylove…And these black men definitely exist because I have one…at one point in time I thought they were just a figure of one’s imagination but I have truly been blessed o have a strong supportive loving blackman in my life.

          • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

             What’s up with all the volume?

            Again, I STATE that she never sees her reflection on TV. It is rare to see a DARK-SKINNED black female as a sexually desirable or love object.

            If you disagree (hopefully with some courtesy) then YOU name the roles in movie and film where a black female as dark as this young lady is playing a positive role.

            What I see is the increase in so-called bi-racial, light-skinned, blonde-weave-wearing, and racially ambiguous females instead of the AUTHENTIC brown and darkskinned black female (my preference, frankly).

            You seldom see a black female in her natural hair, but of course, there is a reason for that and it’s called: WHITE SUPREMACY/BLACK INFERIORITY.

            I would like to recommend a book that explains why black female entertainers MUST wear weaves that look like weaves to be successful on TV and film:

            ‘Black Love Is A Revolutionary Act’ by Umoja

            their website is:

            www_trojanhorse1_com

            check it out

          • Black&naturallybeautiful

            I think wha Paul was saying when he said that she doesn’t see herself on the tv screen, he meant that as an avarage young black girl with kinky hair…9 times out of 10 when you see someone black on tv they are all done up with make up hair and nails done expensive clothes…blah blah blah..somethng that most young black girls don’t have access to. so therefore when they see these things they want to mimic them.

        • Blackfootlion

          I respectfully disagree. Actually when it comes to our own it is has EVERYTHING to do with being Black.

      • Blackfootlion

        So is Beyonce a Natural Blonde and Rihana a Natural RedHead? I think you missed the point.

      • http://profiles.google.com/greeneink Renee Greene

        Wrong.

        These women are as plastic and made up and air-brushed as it gets. Have you seen Beyonce (and even Cameron Diaz or Julia Roberts) without makeup and fake stuff glued on her body? She looks like the home girl down the street that nobody pays attention to.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe if we had more pride in Black beauty, we wouldn’t be as worried about buying cheap trinkets to emulate another culture that has very few characteristics similar to our own.

    • SapphiresMomma

      Right!

      And we all know that black people don’t have “hazel” eyes, huh?

      LOL!

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patricia-Higgs/100002158226430 Patricia Higgs

        Some black people do have hazel eyes, My cousins were born with them, This I no for sure, She were the only one out of four girls.

        • SapphiresMomma

          Ms, Higgs,

          Did you understand my post/response?

          Of course black people have hazel eyes!!

          I would bet that almost every black family has one or several family members that have hazel eyes!

          It is not rare!

      • Samdromeda

           There are black men with skin so black that it shines blue in the sun who have ice blue eyes.

        • SapphiresMomma

          You are absolutely right, and I once had one of those black men that was so black he gave off a blue hue!

          He was the most handsome, perfect man that I had ever seen in my life, and even to this day. Perfect features, with the most beautiful teeth I had ever seen.

          Again, as I have already stated most black families have members with hazel, blue/ green. or grey eyes.. It is nothing new, nor is it odd.

          • TAYA JOHNSON

            my kind of man lol..yes my family also..even gray blue..my niece

        • TeeKsmith

          My grandfather is one of those men and has 2 brothers with gray eyes. I guess genetics are little wierd.

        • TAYA JOHNSON

          thats right !!!

      • Anonymous

        I said nothing about them not having any different color eyes, I just said have more pride in Black beauty. Society doesn’t do it for us….

        What happened to the days of “Black is Beautiful” or “I’m Black and I’m proud”?

        The fact remains is that statistics have shown Blacks have predominantly darker colored eyes as opposed to lighter or varied colored eyes. Does this vary throughout the ethnicity? Without a doubt, but don’t believe that it’s a common occurrence.

      • TAYA JOHNSON

        both of my nieces have hazel eyes..

  • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

     hard to believe that some black people don’t get this, that this is about BRAINWASHING and BRAIN-TRASHING of non-white people by a racist and white supremacist society. It’s the same DISEASE that causes an Asian female to have eye surgery.

    surgery or an Ind

    • Always reflecting

      Thought provoking Mr. Paul and I agree in many regards, thanks.  Honest question – do women of any ethnic group who wear lipstick that is not their natural color embody self-hatred? 

      • Japple1167

        I never leave my house without makeup.  I would love to have anyone else’s legs but my own.  I thought I would look like a Barbie doll when I was young.  As a white woman, I have been trying to live up to that white image all of my life. (Even M. Monroe did not like herself.)  I do not know if that adds to the discussion or not. 

        • http://profiles.google.com/chgosatrap your excellency wealth magnet

          You add plenty, Japple.  I think a lot of marketing to women is done in a degrading way.  Business preys on our self-esteem and emotions.  I am an old black woman. I remember the commercials for hair color, and the jingle, “Is it true blondes have more fun?  Why not be a blonde and see?”  with the happy Caucasian woman finally getting the guy’s attention after changing hair color.  Find the book “Sisterhood is Powerful”, and it will open your eyes.
          Love yourself as you are, warts and all.

          diane

      • SapphiresMomma

        THANK YOU!

        Women have been adorning  themelves with ” beauty additives” since the first woman on earth. LOL!

        Our ancestors certainly did it with beads, plates, beads,  color from berries, plants, and others adornments to make themselves attractive to their men.

        Nothing has changed.

      • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

        There is a HUGE difference between enhancing what Mother Nature gave you  AND attempting to imitate what you believe is a superior race.

        Make-up, hairstyles, jewelry, and clothing are things males and females use to enhance and attract the opposite sex

        That is NOT the same as chemically bleaching one’s skin and frying one’s hair (because one believes one’s own hair is inferior)

        Anymore than a white female starving herself to be thin is the same as changing from a flip hairstyle into a ponytail.

        One is a sign of taste and creativity

        the other is a sign of self-esteem issues

        and I believe most of the folks on this thread know (or should know) the difference between “fashion” and “self-hatred.” What black people do to our bodies and what we value in terms of skin color and hair texture and eye color is AN IMITATION of what white people taught us was superior.

        The white beauty standard is a MADE UP STANDARD that did not exist prior to slavery, European colonization/imperialism and mass media.

        In fact, when Africans first laid eyes on Europeans, they thought they were hideous. If you want a reference, just ask.

        • Anonymous

          Mr. Paul, I consider your points very valid and insightful yet I think there may be room for further reflecting.  I am well aware of the power of the media and its extraordinary impact on the shaping of our psyches.  I too am familiar with the power brokers and the often dominated homogenized European “created standard of beauty.”  I am African-American and live in the very culturally diverse state of Hawaii.  I have seen locally and abroad people who have endangered themselves to attain this elusive “beauty standard.”  However, deciphering between “enhancing what Mother Nature gave you AND attempting to imitate what you believe is a superior race,” may not be as easy as you passionately state.  Please reflect with me – let’s go back in history – it is believed that wearing lipstick was used to mirror the labia engorgement secondary to sexual excitement, hence the initial red color.  The wearing of lipstick was initially taboo among “decent” women.  Now it is considered a common form of “enhancing what mother nature gave us.”  Perhaps if technology permitted in the past, people would have altered their eye color and it wouldn’t be as linked to “self-hatred” as some would now argue. 
           
          Who gets to decide what is self-enhancement and self-disdain based upon where on the face a color alteration has occurred…is it the length of time a product has been exposed to mankind?  The blush on the cheek was also meant to reflect “sexual arousal” and thus attraction – is it too, repulsive and a sign of self-hatred? 
           
          Years ago when I was confronted with emulating Caucasians because I straightened my hair, I vehemently denied this because I was truly comfortable in my skin.  I justified altering my hair due to making it more manageable.  After reflecting more, I recognized that I was a product of my environment and did what was culturally sanctioned.  I realized that my tradition was in great measure born out of an attempt to identify with the standard bearer.  While I recognized this, I knew I fully loved myself.  Nonetheless, I made a conscious decision to go natural.  It has been well over 11 years since I have sported my natural hair but my LOVE for myself was never less and can’t be any greater, thanks to my Maker.  Now having said all of that, we are a society obsessed with perfection and all too often we wrestle with self-esteem issues and become prisoners to the ever elusive profit driven creators of “perfection.”  
           
          By the way, I am also not naive to why certain standards were created nor am I blind to its shift (i.e. “luscious lips”)
           
          Thanks for sharing your thoughts

          • Anonymous

            I almost forgot – those blushing red labial folds were more visible in women of a lighter hue (i.e. Greeco-Roman).  Who emulated them? Now we have a broader range in shades of lip color but there may be something to the history of “enhancement”…

          • Anonymous

            I LOVE Black People (and all people for that matter) and these wonderful reflective posts on both sides!!  :-)

          • Anonymous

            Just re-read your last line about Africans thinking Europeans looked hideous.  I am sure this was shared by other cultures of the predominate peoples of the world, “people of color.”
            In fact, Hawaiians referred to them as Haoles – meaning no breath – essentially he who is without life.  Technically, the term is meant for any foreigner but is colloquially accepted as specific to “whites.”  This is not meant to insult Caucasians but given as a historical account of initial perceptions.

          • Samdromeda

              Who is Mother Nature? I must have missed that class when growing up.

      • Samdromeda

          It is more like a projection of deception where art mimics life.In nature it is the male that is colorful and draws enemies away from the mother and children. But there is the projection of availability. In some cases some women feel that it is part of their business suit. This was a tactic anciently used by Jezebel and Semiramis a projection of power with presumed irresistibility. Disarming and bnnging a man into subjection to her wiles. It takes courage and not self hatred. But some use it with a spirit of fool hardiness.Virginal purity and a pure and truthful heart always shines through.

    • Blackfootlion

      I wouldn’t think I’d have to defend my position but allow me. If you read my post a bit more closely I said Beyonce and Rihana are natural beauties and inspite of this salient fact they feel a need to transform themselves into an image that is “un-natural” by the straightening of the hair, color, contacts etcetera. They were just “examples” of the age old problem in hollywood and the celebrity industry. I thought that was pretty clear. Perhaps not.

  • SapphiresMomma

    Dr. Watkins,

    THANKS!

    For another “let me rile up the negros” article, by showing them how much we MUST hate ourselves because this young girl bought contact lenses that was not her “natural” eye color!

    These girls mostly do this for fashion/style/trying to be hip, more so than hating themselves, or trying to look like someone else.

    When will black folk stop buying into this crap?

    • Ebony

      You seem just a little angry about dealing with the true issues that affect our community.  If you don’t want to hear about them…why are you on this site?  Help me understand.

      • SapphiresMomma

        LOL!

        What anger?

        Just stating my opinion like everyone else!

      • SapphiresMomma

        LOL!

        What anger?

        Just stating my opinion like everyone else!

    • Blackfootlion

      You seem to be very angry so I’m not going to get into a personal argument with you but you are misinformed.  “Fashion, style or trying to be hip” as you say has always been an attempt to be accepted primarily by one’s peers but ultimately by the society at large at the expense of altering one’s own natural beauty … ex. hair, eyes, skin color, breast augmentation, bolemia, plastic surgery etcetera. I can’t speak for what other cultures allow for their children, I can only speak as a Black man that has Black children. And just a side note … the insult “let me rile up the negroes” is grossly inappropriate here and quite frankly offensive. You’re coming across as if you’re more of a provocateur than a Sapphire.

      • SapphiresMomma

        Sorry you are offended, but I stand by my post/opinion/comments!

        As for the “anger”, again, not angry at all! Simply expressing my self just as you and other have done!  What is the problem?

        Could it be that we have different opinions, and because I do not agree with yours why do I have to be “angry”?

        Sorry, but Dr. Watkins is a commentator (I have followed him since his first blog),  who wants to be invited to be on shows to voice his opinions/comments, and one would have to be a fool not to understand that the title of many of his articles/blogs are intended to “rile up the negros”, and most times it works!

        But, not for all of us~

    • Reirhap9

      Our people will stop buying into this stuff when we as Afrikans/so called Black people teach our children about the programming energies which are dictating the paths that they should take and be about. But this becomes difficult because Afrikans/so called Black people are also immersed in these same programming energies which promote all of this madness. And the merry go round goes round and round and you have an innocent child being physically maimed by all of this programming madness. Folks are not looking at what’s really going on!

      My heart goes out to this child … I send her energies of healing, protection and love!

      • SapphiresMomma

        Sorry, but I don’t buy into your theory, and think you are taking it way too far.

        We are black people. We left African generations ago.

        We are black Americans, and frankly I don’t see too many of us running to leave America to go back to Africa.

        Let’s be real here!

        I, too, am sorry for the young teen, however teens do stupid stuff.

        Let’s hope she can recover.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_67WWQKU2EXZAU5D2OSREILUSHM Diana Hatfield

    I paid $32.87 for a XBOX 360 and my mom got a 17 inch Toshiba laptop for $94.83 being delivered to our house tomorrow by FedEX. I will never again pay expensive retail prices at stores. I even sold a 46 inch HDTV to my boss for $650 and it only cost me $52.78 to get. Here is the website we using to get all this stuff, goo.gl/E7RmW

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_67WWQKU2EXZAU5D2OSREILUSHM Diana Hatfield

    I paid $32.87 for a XBOX 360 and my mom got a 17 inch Toshiba laptop for $94.83 being delivered to our house tomorrow by FedEX. I will never again pay expensive retail prices at stores. I even sold a 46 inch HDTV to my boss for $650 and it only cost me $52.78 to get. Here is the website we using to get all this stuff, goo.gl/E7RmW

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_67WWQKU2EXZAU5D2OSREILUSHM Diana Hatfield

    I paid $32.87 for a XBOX 360 and my mom got a 17 inch Toshiba laptop for $94.83 being delivered to our house tomorrow by FedEX. I will never again pay expensive retail prices at stores. I even sold a 46 inch HDTV to my boss for $650 and it only cost me $52.78 to get. Here is the website we using to get all this stuff, goo.gl/E7RmW

  • http://twitter.com/C_Rich75 C. World

    My prayers go out to this young sister. I hope she regains her normal vision.

    Westernized(caucasian) standard of beauty,need to be vanquished from the minds of our people. She was just fine the way she was.

  • http://profiles.google.com/greeneink Renee Greene

    Don’t be phony and fake. Accept the color of your eyes as they are. And most importantly, don’t buy cheap shyte from cheap stores that has to go in or on your body. 

    America is filled with imports from foreign countries that not only take jobs from Americans, but they are unregulated products that are filled with and poisons (in the paints, colorings and materials they use to make these items) from countries where there are no laws that protect people from pollutants, irritants, or toxins — even known cancer causing agents like the kind that are outlawed in America. They love selling these decrepit items to the poorest people in our society, particularly in stores like .99 Stores, Everything’s A Dollar, and The $10 Boutique.These are all imports that have taken jobs out of the communities that they sell these cheap poisonous items, foods, and articles to.Van Jones talks about exposing the chemical and environmental poisons that rich whites and rich foreigners beg off on blacks and minorities who they also do not pay or supply benefits to – yet who are making them extremely rich because we’d rather eat crap and die than take the political measures to get them out of our neighborhoods.

    Get the jobs back here, get this stuff regulated, and quit trying to be something you are NOT. 

    Black women, your eyes, your butt, your breasts, your lips, and your other god-given features are FOR BLACK WOMEN ONLY.

    LEAVE THEM ALONE!!! 

    God made you like He did for a reason. You have to be identified by your Judaic and Semitic traits when the Lord returns. That’s why “we” don’t look like any other race – not even in skin color.

  • ShavonQueen

    Wonderful Discussion,

    There are a lot of valid points in this thread, I wont add redundancy to the conversation.

    In my opinion, there is nothing wrong with a women adding things to her appearance. The reasons why she chooses to “add” “stuff” determines how she feels and what she has been taught about her culture. Simply put, if the sista feels just as “fine” with the “additives” off as she does with them on. Then this is a healthy self image. But if she feels like she must have these “additives” in order to be attractive, then this is a result of a Negative self image…..

    I pray that the young sista develops a healthy self image. I hope the older sisters in her community womb her a little, especially after all this press.

    Sending her energy.

  • Prinzez

    And we hear why she did what she did.  Lord Jesus.

  • BlkSultry007

    we beat Baskin & Robins in shade of color , from bluest black to ghost white.  We also have different shades of eye color because of our mixture.  Hazel eyes as well as blues eyes can be found in black people.  All blacks do not have dark brown eyes

  • Afrotapp

    Wow!  Buying contact from the corner store?  I know everyone else wants to talk about beauty and where we find it, but I can’t get past buying contacts from a corner store.  Did the store get closed down?  Next they will be at the dollar store.  .  . using tap water!?  What the heck?

  • Jasamine Thomas

    Your right proper instruction but were always quick to give the other race money for cheap inferior products I bet they cam from Chaina or somewhere over there and they may have been made with cow poop they dod not care they will make and sell anything, mad out of anything FDA does not know  about half the stuff at the Beauty supply store  and we like dummies continue to spend the few dollars we do have on the stuff from the Beauty supply we do not need trying to look cute and make ourselves to look like someone we are not…African Americans are the race that can not afford the products but  they prosper  to tune of Billions… 

  • Anonymous

    I wouldn’t go so far as to say that the young girl in question consciously or subconsciously hates her blackness, because honestly, I don’t think the article gives me enough information to draw that conclusion.  Having been a 14 year old girl myself once, I do know that we can be quite fickle.  The beauty rage of the day when I was her age was the dookie braids hairstyle Janet Jackson wore in the movie Poetic Justice.  I had my best friend at the time put them in for me.  She wasn’t a licensed hair dresser, and I nearly lost every hair on my head because the braids were too tight.  That wasn’t the first or the last time I suffered for fashion.  This young lady may be no different.  She may have just wanted to change up her look for fun or to catch a boy’s eye, and yes, even to reject her blackness.  I just don’t think the story offers us enough information to know for sure.

    I don’t know if we are reacting so strongly to this because there is something visceral about a black girl wanting something other than dark brown eyes, but I think we may want to withhold judgement until we know more about the story. 

    • Sherry Favors

      What an excellent intelligent comment!

      • Anonymous

        Thanks, Sherry!

    • Anonymous

      Obviously there is not enough information to inform oneself of her reasoning for her decision. At 14 years of age, there isn’t enough maturity or accountability on average to know a fad fashion statement or the fickleness in fleeting beauty. I am not saying in anyway that she did this for any specific reason, but speculation is the only thing that can be had at this point. In addition, I will too keep an eye on this story.

    • TAYA JOHNSON

      very well said!!!

    • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

       I do not understand for the life of me why this debate is taking place
      among black people with all of our OBVIOUS skin color issues (remember
      the ‘paper bag test?’), and just the phrase “good hair” speaks VOLUMES
      about our issues regarding the man or woman in the mirror.

      how
      many of you can HONESTLY say your views on beauty are not colored by
      white supremacy beauty standards? I cannot believe the amount of denial
      on this thread. No wonder we can’t solve the problem, let alone help our
      children deal with their manufactured inferiority complexes.

      Five more words — and then I’m DONE.

      BLACK DOLL/WHITE DOLL EXPERIMENT. 

      • Anonymous

        I don’t understand how black people who have never met this girl or heard her side of the story can be so presumptuous as to assume that her purchase of colored contacts was a part of her quest for whiteness.  I know it may come as a surprise to you, but some black people are actually comfortable in their own skin.  Not all black people are so psychologically crippled by white standards of beauty that they are an eternal quest to reject their blackness.  Sometimes fashion really is just fashion for women, nothing more, nothing less.  That is not to say that many black people do not suffer from severe forms of self-hatred, but what in this story has given anyone enough information to make that determination?

        Paris Hilton’s hair is naturally brown, and so are her eyes.  She dyes her hair and wears blue contact lenses.  She also wears hair weaves (she even has her own line of them), yet I doubt that she would be accused of hating herself.  Bo Derek famously wore cornrows in the movie 10.  Although cornrows are a traditionally black hairstyle,  no one has accused her of being uncomfortable in her whiteness.  How odd I find it that white women can change their appearance without being accused of having self-hatred issues, but when a black woman does it, she has a low sense of racial self-esteem.

        I really take exception to black people who get angry when white people treat the entire entire black race as a monolith, but then turn around and do the same thing.  Not all black women are Pecola from The Bluest Eye.  Your comments were paternalistic and condescending.  What gives you the right or the qualification to diagnose this girl as suffering from an acute sense of self-hatred?

        • Samdromeda

            It is called freedom of speech. How can you sample the consciousness if you repress the comment? I enjoy the dialogue.Apparently Taya Johnson does too.

  • Brook

    This is a very sad story.  No young woman should have to go through something like this. I feel for her and her family. 

  • Jai

    I definitely have battled with the idea that I have to be skinny, flawless and made up with either a different eye color, longer/straighter hair, and/or revealing clothes. Mr. Paul H. is correct, we are taught (and when I say we, not just black women, but ALL women) that we fall below the spectrum of beauty without enhancements. Every commercial, every magazine cover, every beauty pageant depicts “perfection”. (Notice the quotation marks). Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Not everyone will find the same person beautiful, but the equation for beauty is simply defined as we see it…skinny+long hair+long legs+bright eyes+long eye lashes+skimpy clothes= Beauty. It’s plastered all over America. And yes, white women are portrayed as the most beautiful women ever created. They have been for years, but blacks, hispanics, asians, and foreign women have had their chance to shine too. Deep down, lots of men desire exotic women, they just choose to hide it. The race issue is still alive. Most act as if it is not. In truth, ALL women are beautiful. No matter what color you are. There is no reason to try and enhance anything. Beyonce, Rihanna, Jennifer Lopez…all of these women have lost themselves in a false reality, that digital enhancements, physical enhancements, additions, subtractions, and ad-ons are needed to be beautiful. So when will we teach our children, of every color to be proud of who they are and showcase not just their physical beauty but their beauty from the inside? 

    • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

       I do not understand for the life of me why this debate is taking place among black people with all of our OBVIOUS skin color issues (remember the ‘paper bag test?’), and just the phrase “good hair” speaks VOLUMES about our issues regarding the man or woman in the mirror.

      how many of you can HONESTLY say your views on beauty are not colored by white supremacy beauty standards? I cannot believe the amount of denial on this thread. No wonder we can’t solve the problem, let alone help our children deal with their manufactured inferiority complexes.

      Five more words — and then I’m DONE.

      BLACK DOLL/WHITE DOLL EXPERIMENT. 

      Need I say anymore?

  • Aaron

    I’m truly sadden to hear of this very unfortunate mishap, I pray this can be reversed without any other problems. The store should be held accountable civilly and for sales of that type to minors.

  • Ttisbac

    That poor girl. I pray that she gets the cornea  but, I’m sure she will because one of our African American Children will be Murdered , so there will be many donations. But that’s another story !

    • SapphiresMomma

      Don’t be too sure!

      Unfortunately, black people are in the bottom percentage  when it comes to donating body parts/blood/plasma/platlets/kidneys/hearts/bone marrow/eyes, and anything else of value to others.

      In addition, and again unfortunately, one of the African American children that will be murdered will be murdered by one of our own.

      Sad, but true!

  • TAYA JOHNSON

    we as black people have brown green hazel gray and blue eyes…

  • Alexandercassidy

    @font-face {
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    as a gay white man, i find it ridiculous that when a black
    woman changes her eye colour or hair style/texture she gets accused of denying
    her “blackness” or “trying to be white”. Its simply unfair
    and a perfect example of the subtleties of racism. How come white women dye
    their hair black, get curls, and tan profusely while nobody ever accuses them
    of denying their “whiteness” or “trying to be black” (ok,
    sometimes they do, but you have to admit not to the extent that black women do)
    Its really not fair. If a black women decides to wear her hair natural or perm,
    it doesn’t mean anything except reflect her personal aesthetics towards beauty
    and style. I’m not saying that racism doesn’t/hasn’t warped perceptions of
    beauty. But black women deserve the same luxury as white women, which is to do
    whatever they want to their hair, eyes, nails, skin, dress, etc. without being
    judged as not having black pride because she decides to bleach her hair and
    wear a bob….

    • SapphiresMomma

      Gay, white or whatever, your comments are absolutely correct!

      Thank you!

    • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

      the one thing I have learned about whites — be they straight OR homosexual — is they have NO DESIRE to see blacks wake up from this psychological fog called “white identification.

      Whites are reassured that as long as blacks remain self-hating, we will never effectively challenge the system of white supremacy/white privilege. So, I expect whites to encourage this behavior of imitating whites by convincing blacks that it is “normal”

      carry on…

    • SapphiresMomma

      Sorry Paul H., but let’s tell the real truth!

      Most whites are busy going about their lives doing what they do, and trying to keep their heads above water just as other human beings on the planet are doing.

      Most are not sitting around plotting on how to keep black people in a “psychological fog”, when the real truth is that it is mostly  many black people who keep themsleves in an inferior fog that many just can’t seem to move past.

      It is truly sad, and more so when we have people  with mindsets that are still on the plantation.

      We should be about moving forward by educating ourselves, uplifting each other,  and not always with our heads into what we think white people are doing/thinking. We spend so much time looking back that we can’t move forward.

      We have some serious issues/problems that must be resolved if we are to collectivly move into a positive future.

      We know we have some serious problems when the Mexicasn who can’t speak english, is  dirt poor, uneducated,  can come to the USA and rise up while too many of us are still on the bottom.

      We need to seriously think about why?

      • Samdromeda

          Without a vision the people perish.

  • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

    I know it’s
    politically correct for educated (assimilated) blacks to pretend whites
    and blacks are the same, but that false notion is not only historically
    BUT scientifically INCORRECT.

    In addition, whites don’t believe
    they are the same as blacks so it baffles me why so many blacks on this
    thread who have certainly been bitten by the dragon of racism/white
    supremacy are so quick to deny the reality that is right in front of our
    faces:

    “good hair”
    “pretty (light) eyes”
    “nice (light) skin tone”
    “pretty long hair (like white people’s)
    “a good grade of hair (like white people’s)
    “you black and ugly so and so”
    “You
    so ugly, I could make gorilla cookies out of your face” — Sanford and
    Son, Redd Foxx speaking to a DARK-SKINNED BLACK FEMALE  Aunt Esther

    “Look at that buckshot” — Martin Lawrence speaking to brown skinned female about the hair on the nape of her neck.

    “Those
    are the ugliest, nappy-headed girls I ever saw,” black male comic, D.L.
    Hughley on the Jay Leno show, referring to the six black girls on the
    Rutgers basketball team (Don Imus)

    “big blubber lips”

    (black folks tucking their lips in to minimize the size)

    black males wearing “conks” by pouring LYE on their scalps and burning their skin

    black females putting “hot” combs to straighten their hair, risking scalp burns

    and on and on and on

    pretending, pretending, pretending this is normal behavior….

    that’s
    what makes all this denial that over 500 years blacks have not been
    brainwashed and brain-trashed against our own natural black beauty  so
    astounding… 

    • Anonymous

      I don’t understand how black people who have never met this girl or heard her side of the story can be so presumptuous as to assume that her purchase of colored contacts was a part of her quest for whiteness.  I know it may come as a surprise to you, but some black people are actually comfortable in their own skin.  Not all black people are so psychologically crippled by white standards of beauty that they are an eternal quest to reject their blackness.  Sometimes fashion really is just fashion for women, nothing more, nothing less.  That is not to say that many black people do not suffer from severe forms of self-hatred, but what in this story has given anyone enough information to make that determination?Paris Hilton’s hair is naturally brown, and so are her eyes.  She dyes her hair and wears blue contact lenses.  She also wears hair weaves (she even has her own line of them), yet I doubt that she would be accused of hating herself.  Bo Derek famously wore cornrows in the movie 10.  Although cornrows are a traditionally black hairstyle,  no one has accused her of being uncomfortable in her whiteness.  How odd I find it that white women can change their appearance without being accused of having self-hatred issues, but when a black woman does it, she has a low sense of racial self-esteem.I really take exception to black people who get angry when white people treat the entire entire black race as a monolith, but then turn around and do the same thing.  Not all black women are Pecola from The Bluest Eye.  Your comments were paternalistic and condescending.  What gives you the right or the qualification to diagnose this girl as suffering from an acute sense of self-hatred?

      • Samdromeda

        Very good. You could teach classes in assertiveness to shy people. 

      • Anonymous

        Your comments are are well taken, and right on the money!

        It is sad that so many of us seem to have “self-hatred” on speed dial!

        If we want to enjoy a fashion/style we have to hate our blackness or we have “low self-esteem”!  This is foolish, backward thinking.

        Thank you for your post~

      • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

        Again, it is one thing to enhance one’s OWN natural beauty and another thing altogether to IMITATE the “beauty” of another race that we have been taught is superior to the extent that we harm our own bodies…

        Never said all black people are self-hating — and I never said BW don’t have the right to change their looks, since my wife does that often

        however when “changing” involves referring to other black people as having…

        “good hair”
        “pretty (light) eyes”
        “nice (light) skin tone”
        “pretty long hair (like white people’s)
        “a good grade of hair (like white people’s)

        or degrading other black people as …

        “you black and ugly so and so”
        “You
        so ugly, I could make gorilla cookies out of your face” — Sanford and
        Son, Redd Foxx speaking to a DARK-SKINNED BLACK FEMALE  Aunt Esther

        or when it involves…

        black males wearing “conks” by pouring LYE on their scalps and burning their skin to have hair like white males

        black females putting “hot” combs to straighten their hair, risking scalp and ear burns

        platinum blonde Hair
        weaves against brown and
        dark skin, which cost an enormous amount of time and money to maintain

        and comparing this to “Paris Hilton changing her hair color”

        then pretending this is normal behavior….that has nothing to do with self-esteem issues..

        then somebody might be in serious denial…

        that you considered my  post paternalistic (which is odd since I also included BM’s issues with beauty in my post)

        doesn’t change my position

        what we can do is agree to disagree

        • Anonymous

          “Never said all black people are self-hating — and I never said BW don’t have the right to change their looks, since my wife does that oftenhowever when “changing” involves referring to other black people as having… “good hair” “pretty (light) eyes” “nice (light) skin tone” “pretty long hair (like white people’s)”a good grade of hair (like white people’s)or degrading other black people as ..”

          My point is that you are interjecting all of these themes into this story without any evidence that it applies to this girl specifically.  You are on your soapbox giving us this litany of black identity issues, and it doesn’t seem to bother you in the slightest that the article doesn’t give any direct quotes from the girl or her family, yet you thrust all these racial insecurity issues upon her and upon those of us who choose to remain objective about the story.  It is akin to the same racial ignorance displayed by white people who look at an objective set of facts as it relates to a black person, and then make a subjective negative diagnosis about that person’s worth, intelligence, or character without knowing anything else about him/her.  It’s racist either way.  However, in a way, your form of racism is more insidious because you are also black, but you can’t seem to come to grips with the notion that a person can be both comfortable in her blackness and experimental in her look.  Last time I checked, black people still had the freedom of self-determination.  Leave this girl and the rest of us “objective folk” alone to “be who we be”. 

          • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

             No, I think your point is you DISAGREE with me. That’s it. Nothing more. Your view is no more valid than mine, in fact, THE FACTS, bear me out.

            I wonder if you would argue so vigorously with the creators of the ‘Black Doll/White Doll’ experiment and would you accuse them of “interjecting” and “thrusting racial insecurity issues” that even a BLIND MAN (or woman — don’t want to be accused of being sexist) could see that many black people have.

            What makes me suspicious that you might be a white person is your MIS-use of the word “racism.” It is common for whites to pose as black people in order to divert and derail a LEGITIMATE discussion about the effects of 500 years of racism/white supremacy on its black victims.

            Regardless, me posting an opinion AS A BLACK MAN who has been damaged by a lifetime of racism/white supremacy (which qualifies me to have an opinion) is NOT the same as me being “racist.”

            Me disagreeing with you does not make me “racist” but is simply a weak attempt to get me TO SHUT UP talking about racism/white supremacy. (sorry that won’t work). That’s why i strongly suspect you are a white person, which is cool, since you are free to post an opinion the same as me.

            Racism is a SYSTEM where whites practice race-ism against non-whites. Racism requires power and the institutions to implement that power. Black people do not have the power to affect the lives of white people collectively (and white people know this) — which means blacks cannot practice racism. But I guess  you’ll debate this point — as is your right.

            But let me end with this: This is NOT your personal blog. This is NOT your website. You do not control or own this space. That being said, you cannot tell me (or anyone else) to “leave this girl and the rest of us (who is that?) alone. 

            No one is obligated to agree with your short-sighted viewpoints so I would suggest you simply move on to other posts that are more to your liking.

          • Anonymous

            My point is what I said it was.  You are interjecting racial self-esteem issues into a story that doesn’t provide any evidence of it.  Buying colored contacts alone is not proof of racial self-hatred.  Yet, that is all the story presents us with. 

            The doll test does give us some insight into how SOME black people feel/felt about themselves, but it is not the gospel truth for all black people. 

            I’m not surpised that you doubt that I’m black, because I’m one of those black people you seem to think don’t exist–one who is comfortable in her own skin and doesn’t view the world through the prism of being a perpetual victim.

            I didn’t misapply the term racism.  I think the term fits here because you know little about this young girl besides the fact that she bought colored contacts.  Yet, you’ve saddled her with the negative label of being self-hating only because she is black.  The same fate could have been befallen a white girl, but you wouldn’t have put that label on her. 

            You are right.  I don’t control or own this blog.  We are all free to speak our minds here, but I won’t apologize for asking you to stop picking on this girl (or me, or anyone who thinks like me).  You really should leave this girl alone.  She’s 14, and you’re ostensibly a grown man.  How can you possibly know what her motivation was?  You can quote all the studies you want to, but that doesn’t mean it applies to her.  You say that THE FACTS bear out your claims, but what are the facts, really about this girl? 

            Did she previously mention a desire to appear more eurocentric?  Did she tell anyone she doesn’t like the color of her skin or the shape of her nose?  Does she idolize only white celebrities to the exclusion of black ones?  Sir Paul, the reality is that we don’t know the facts because the story provides no context.  It seems that you are simply trying to push a square peg into a round hole hoping it fits. 

            Good night to you, sir.

          • http://www.trojanhorse1.com Paul H.

            Again, to compare my comment to “racism” clearly indicates you have no idea what the word means. (racism doesn’t mean you disagree what someone else posts).

            And as I kindly suggest, if you don’t like my posts move on. You don’t own this blog or site.

            And please stop accusing me of “picking” on a young girl who isn’t even reading my comments (good grief). Guilt trips and accusations are a sorry replacement for LOGIC and FACTS. Seriously….your “outrage” is misplaced and somewhat disingenuous..

            I suspect you’re the main one (and probably) the only who is offended, but so it goes on the faceless, anonymous internet.

             Like I said, we can agree to disagree.

            (I still think you’re a white person :-)

          • Anonymous

            I can see I won’t get an answer out of you as to how the doll test or other “facts” as you see them apply specifically to this girl’s story.  Moving on…

      • Samdromeda

        Paternalistic???    In its application it implies a war between the genders. A divisive and characterologically demeaning term. It is often seen as a way of muting Fathers and eliminating their role as leaders of families.Paternalistic has become a term of objectification and has been an effective tool for destroying familial unity  and trust between the sexes. To undermine is to seize power. But in that power grab many women have seized the dragon by the tail. It is a wild ride but have fun. My what big teeth you have mother.

        • Anonymous

          ???

          • Samdromeda

              I stand corrected. Paternalistic or paternalism is the control of a country, community, or group in a manner suggestive of a father looking after his children. However I have seen a paradoxical misapplication to demean father like protective control. If your application is as pure as the definition then I apologize. Please re- read what I said about the contemporary application of the term “Paternalistic.” There are others who draw similar conclusions. Paternalistic has become like a curse word.

        • Anonymous

          ???

  • Tunie

    There are Blacks that have naturally hazel,blue and eyes. I went to school with a boy who had to different color eyes. Now that was strange.

  • Marcusdavis40

    Wearing contact lens in my opinion is dodgey to begin with ,unless its an alternative  to wearing  regular glasses ,to wear contacts just for a fashion statement is stupid .Unfortunate set of circumstances  but why did’nt the girls  parents talk some sense into her to begin with?   

  • mztrish

    Typical  problems with some black people is that they have forgotten what Dr King and others have fought for…in the words of Dr King when he stated that he looked forward to a world that “we” as a people would be judged by the content of our character not the “color” of our skin…but as long as we continue to be so concerned about the outside and have forsaken the inside (brains) tragedies like these will continue to happen to our children…

  • Anonymous

    sdfdsfsdfs

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