Dr. Boyce: Why I am Ditching Lil Wayne Completely

I love hip-hop.  I want to support it.  I try to understand those who are a few years behind me and support their efforts to become empowered and thoughtful individuals.  But after hearing the lyrics from a Lil Wayne song (an artist who’d already pushed me to the edge), I had to take a moment of pause and make a quick comment regarding how he has firmly positioned himself as an enemy of the black community.  In the song, “We Be Steady Mobbin,” Lil Wayne says this:

“I swear you can’t fuck with me
But I can fuck your girl and make her nut for me
Then slut for me, then kill for me, then steal for me
And of course it’ll be your cash
And I’ll murder that bitch and send her body back to your ass”

This verse, and a few others, served as the straw that broke the camel’s back.  There is a difference between natural, compelling entertainment and (as one of our Facebook fans refers to as) “weaponized” brainwashing.  The word “weaponized” is an accurate descriptor of poison that’s been concentrated, packaged and targeted in large quantities.

Corporate America has wired the hip-hop game in such a way that millions of our kids are encouraged to consume the messages of Lil Wayne and other artists every day of their lives, the same way soldiers are asked to recite the pledge of allegiance every morning before breakfast.  In fact, I can’t think of any other group of people where popular music has such a dramatic impact on the definition of an entire community’s culture: it dictates how our kids dress, how they speak, the tattoos they wear, what they do on the weekends, how they respond to aggression and how they conduct their sex lives. Since mostly white-owned corporations control the music that our kids hear every day, they effectively have the power to shift the direction of African American culture at the next shareholder’s meeting.

As a direct result of messages they are fed from commercialized hip-hop music, millions of black boys are religiously emulating the behaviors being promoted by their favorite hip-hop artists….black men are the most likely to die from gun violence, spreading HIV in droves (with far too many of us not going to the doctor), the most likely to go to prison and the least likely to be educated. Commercialized hip-hop is no longer good, fun entertainment; it has evolved into a regimen of brainwashing that is no less powerful than the one that Adolf Hitler used during the Nazi regime.  It is an instructional manual that our teens pick up at the latest episode of BET’s 106 & Park, where I last saw the artist Wiz Khalifa perform a song called “On My Level,” where he jokes about driving while drunk, consuming a wild variety of drugs, and having irresponsible sex with a big pile of women.

This music also has an interesting impact on young women, far too many of whom find themselves in violent and abusive relationships, overlooking reckless behavior on the part of men, and even finding themselves intrigued by it.  In the song I mentioned earlier, Lil Wayne makes reference to goons interacting with goblins, which reminds me of too many African American relationships, where women turn themselves into goblins in order to deal with the hip-hop generated goons they consistently meet in the dating pool.  When it’s all said and done, these same women have no idea how to react when true love comes knocking, and turn down decent, loving men, all so they can pursue the thug who reminds them of their favorite rap star.

There is also an interesting contradiction that female support of Lil Wayne sends to young men.  On one hand, men hear that women expect men to be respectful.  But then they notice that Lil Wayne makes songs about disrespecting women and dumping their dead bodies, only to find that it makes him that much more appealing.  It’s difficult to demand respect from men and simultaneously recite lyrics to songs that reference women to be worthless, ignorant sex objects.  The same way the young women at Spelman stood up against the rapper Nelly in 2004 (when he swiped a credit card through a woman’s backside, a light-weight move for Lil Wayne), black women across America hold the keys to Little Waynes acceptance into the psyches of the men with whom they interact.  But if women are endorsing this form of music and talking about how sexy they consider Lil Wayne to be, then how can they become distraught when men emulate Wayne’s behavior?

Personally, I am now officially boycotting Lil Wayne.  It breaks my heart to do this, because the last thing I’d ever want to do is make an enemy out of my own brother.  I also consider Lil Wayne to be one of the most talented commercialized hip-hop artists in America (I clearly admit to respecting his lyrical capabilities).  But one thing I can’t support is this kind of irresponsible music without realizing the implications that it has on our young children, and how their lives are destroyed before they even have a chance to make decisions for themselves.  The same way the Arabic community pushes children to memorize the Qur’an at an early age, African American children memorize the recipe for their own self-destruction on the radio every single morning.

From what I know about Lil Wayne (and friends I have who know him directly), he feeds on this kind of reaction to his music.  He prides himself on being an animal or some kind of beast, and effectively avoids the assumption of any of the responsibility that comes with leadership.   But perhaps Wayne will one day realize that he is no longer the young, powerless, poverty-stricken victim of urban violence that he was 20 years ago, and has now has the ability to shape the world in which his daughter is going to grow up.  As a father of daughters myself, I hope that this helps to establish a common interest between myself and Wayne where I help this brother realize that there is no pride in a black man claiming himself to be subhuman.  Our children need us to be better than that.

Dr. Boyce Watkins is a Professor at Syracuse University and founder of the Your Black World Coalition.  To have Dr. Boyce commentary delivered to your email, please click here.

 

  • Brook

    It’s about time someone ditched Lil Wayne.  He’s a plague to black people. 

  • DJ PANIC

    AWW PLZ ITS TO LATE TO BOYCOTT HIM ARE YOU PPL SERIOUS THAT WAS 90 SONGS AGO PLZ GET A LIFE AND LET THIS YOUNG MAN LIVE HIS DREAM & STOP WITH THE BLAMING RAPPERS FOR INCIDENTS THAT HAPPEN IN THIS WORLD LYRICS DON’T KILL PEOPLE PEOPLE KILL PEOPLE

    • Brook

      It’s never too late to boycott. 

    • Wiseriam

      We don’t need to let anyone, let alone a fellow Black male, contribute to the continued demise of black males. You can type in all caps, but Black Men are standing up and taking the community back. Get used to it. So, if you share a desire to contribute to the destruction of the Black community, get your fun and money now, cause the window of opportunity will close.

    • Chris

      As long as you are breathing it’s never too late. That’s the mind set of someone that will accomplish very little in their life time. We have to make a stand as a community once and for all for the minds of our children. In your mind it may be too late , so just move out the way and let the rest of us get to work. I will never give up on creating a better world for my children. In my book Lil Wayne and those like him that put out garbage are done. I’m not saying we can stop him but we can make a impact that can not be ignored. Take some notes from the past. I’m glad Martin Luther King and those who went to battle on all our behalf didn’t say “It’s too late”.

    • Anonymous

      It is true that people kill people. But think about this, people incite people to kill other people.

      That is why in a court of law, a person can receive a harsh sentence for inciting other people to violence. It is as though they committed the crime.

      Lil’ Wayne can live his little dream, it’s cool for him to make money. No one wants him to be unsuccessful, but he doesn’t have to do it with violence against the community in which he lives. 

      Luther Vandross was successful. He can take a page out of his book.

    • Lakeshiawootentherapy

      There is a little kid saying that I’ve heard awhile back “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt!” I feel that saying is not all that true, because People become who  they represent and if you present yourself as a representation of music, which is a big needed source in our world,then you become a walking and talking source of lyrics. Words are very powerful, and they are used in every content. Even when a murderer has to be represented, and those closing arguments is going to be the key element in determining whether or not he’s guilty by the juror, it’s the words and the the thoughts that can kill a person’s spirit and then become actions to kill a person completley

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Shakka-Zulu/1379420279 Shakka Zulu

    This is why we are having these children in our communities always so angry with each other, will readily kill each other over something as simple as stepping on each others new tennis shoes, brushing against each other, and just plain looking each other in the eyes…This prison culture advertised with the clothing and style of dress, these rappers going in and out of prison to get a top sellers, advocating violence, etc has been a reason for some of the steady decline in the rap music since the mixing of the east/west coast blending of the different style of raps…The companies who are promoting this type of behavior is doing it for the purpose of poisoning these young people’s mind and killing off the next generation through incarceration, murders, suicide, etc…This crap is exported around the globe and bought by more whites than blacks, but our children seems to be the only ones being programmed to commit genocide on each other in trying to live the lies expressed in the songs and music videos…I have not bought any albums or cd’s in several years, I’ll only listen to jazz, but i’m mostly a talk radio junkie and my children are not into this brand of brain scrambling garbage….

    • black woman

      AAAMEN..I could not have said it BETTER. And you know the really sad part of these men being with white women is that after they (the white women) are done with them (The black men) THEY DON’T WANT THE CHILDRED THEY HAD EITHER.

    • black woman

      AAAMEN..I could not have said it BETTER. And you know the really sad part of these men being with white women is that after they (the white women) are done with them (The black men) THEY DON’T WANT THE CHILDRED THEY HAD EITHER.

    • DWimberlyeffect

      Our children follow whatever they SEE and HEAR most.  I control images and audios in my home.  My daughter, now 18, is allowed to choose what she listens to and wears (she is NOT allowed to dress, talk, or act like a woman who does not respect herself or her sisters), but my son, 11, cannot have a cell phone, watch what he wants (without my agreement), have a Facebook or twitter account.  You know what I’m saying.  Parents are NOT active.  The American system has us surrounded and wants to destroy our defenses; keep us as slaves.  So, PARENTS must fight everything that does not RESPECT us.  We may not change the system soon, but my friends and family hear the CONSTANT sound of my voice to defend themselves.

      You want to DO something?  Raise your children with modesty and character in mind and don’t let ANYONE in their lives that doesn’t have your same ideals, work ethic or vision.  By the way, my son is in the 96th and 98th percentile in Reading and Math, respectively with straight As. My daughter will be attending a state university in the fall on scholarship.  She wants to be a pediatrician.  And furthermore, we live on the south side of Chicago…IN the city, not suburbs.

      Let you with ears to hear, HEAR!

  • Ced Cooper

    I don’t always agree with Dr. Boyce, but this time, he hit it righ on the nail.  Although Lil Wayne can rap, I guess, it doesn’t mean that he is representing Hip Hop.  HIP HOP IS NOT ON THE RADIO.  And Lil Weezy is all over the radio.  Lil W is a perfect example of why there are no more political movements among black youth…there is no music to motivate them to do anything but chase vagina, money, and a good party with half naked women. Its obvious that Weezy and most of these other so-called rappers learned nothing from the Greats of the 80s & 90s.  KRS ONE needs to end Weezy’s career like he did to Nelly.

    As powerful as hip hop and rap has become, immature artists like Weezy continue to squander the opportunity to make positive differences in the lives of their fans.  They would rather create unhelpful, demeaning material that does nothing but feed into the media industry’s insistence on dumbing down America.

    • Dedove7573524064

      What you doing ’bout it?

      • Makarios72

        At least Ced Cooper is speaking out…  What you doing bout it?? 

        • Dedove7573524064

          I’m speaking the truth, Makarios; quoting Bill Clinton,(again) “its the economy, stupid”! The Love of money is the ROOT of ALL evil.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Dwayne-Jenkins/1235404930 Dwayne Jenkins

    Way past due….The gremlin must be stopped.

  • Corduroy

    I support this. Wholeheartedly. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/unclekipper Kipper Jones

    Just like the Tea Party HIJACKED the Republican party, Mr. Carter and his constituency have HIJACKED HIP HOP!!!

  • Cd3554

    This is what happens when the record companies, AFTRA, AMFI change the form of Black music. Nelson George covers this in his book. The autopsy  of Soul Music has been administered followed by the eulogy and now good artist that wrote songs about Love and social consciousness , self awareness with real musicians and melody and choruses, and bridges, and hook in songs are dead. FYI: It started when public schools got rid of music classes. 

    • Mflogic

      They are not dead.  They are just not supported as well as they should be even within their own communities.  As much as people would like to shut rappers like lil Wayne down, many still listen to their music on the radio, and promote them on their websites, blogs, or whatever just to get a piece of the pie that corporations are making from the hip hop market.  All the positive rappers and poets have been pushed to the side with little to no support.  They are the ones during it for the love. They are the ones that will not sell out for the market.  I don’t see many of them being promoted on BET, MTV, Channel One, Essence, etc… The game can change, but it is our own culture who allow this to go on.

  • Anonymous

    Okay, Dr. Boyce, for the most part I agree with you on this one.  Now let’s see you man up and boycott all those rappers with songs that denigrate black women.   Once you do that, maybe I can start respecting you again.

  • Anonymous

    Good goin’ Dr. Boyce.  Now Blast it on Change.com so you can get other people to sign a petition.  Speak to the nation, not just your followers.  And ask Rev Al and Steve Harvey and all the converts to fame (hip hop) do the same.  These hip hop rappers are turning black women into objects to be used and thrown away, while they declare their worship of white women in their private lives.  They fancy themselves “rockers,” in the white boy tradition with their long dreads, jeans and t-shirts, and deny any allegiance to black women.  Fine, to each his own, I would never want a Black man who wanted a White woman, anyway.  And the poor ignorant Black girls and teenagers who appear in their videos are kicking themselves under the bus for a chance to look sexy on screen.  Lil Wayne and all of them are slaves, being run by the corporate master, only they’re getting 120 acres, instead of 40.

    • Argylek

      I think you meant http://www.change.org/, change . com is a lingerie website.

      I respectfully disagree your comment about the black hip hop star’s allegiance to their black women – I think these stars surround themselves with women who do not command their respect, and who are only trying to climb the social ladder through the rappers’ videos and the like. There are plenty of good examples of black men who are married to and appreciate their black women, and I do mean in the rap game. It’s just that it isn’t as cool to sing about that.

      • Anonymous

        Thanks for that, Argylek.  And I’ll take your word for it that there are some men out there who appreciate Black women.  It’s hard to believe it when you see this site: http://www.afieldnegro.com/photos.html

        • Dedove7573524064

          Again, its the economy, stupid! Bill Clinton said. The Love of money, everyone knows, according to sacred scripture, is the ROOT of ALL evil. C’mon folks. Please try to get it!

          • Anonymous

            We get it, but that does not excuse free will, something the Bible also exhorts. 

    • KB

      You’re right!  Women are the hip hop rappers, and mostly all other men’s objective.  Just like the black woman says that a good man is their objective – to that I say – WHATEVER!  Women choose the man, the man does not choose the woman.  Men can only do what a woman allows the man to do.  So if the woman chooses “right” she gets “right”.  Then if a man wants a woman he will not be able to do all those things to women that I and unfortunately less and less of society frown upon.

      • Anonymous

        I think you’re saying something kind of profound.  Could you try to explain a bit more?

        • KB

          I’m just saying that men, well most straight and even some gay men (the cats on the DL), do what they do to achieve the goal of acquiring women as a mate or as mates or maybe just sex.  Either way the man does what works to get women.  If women want a lot of money, the man tries to make or pretends to make a lot of money.  If a woman wants to be seen in the latest and greatest car or truck, then guess what the man does.  Unfortunately to get the money or the rides women choose to lower or change their standards and get hoochiefied to get the attention ot the “Ballers and Shot Callers”.  If women expected to get treated a certain way, umm let me put that another way – if women expected to get treated “well” and like women instead of like hoochies, in order to get the women these Ballers and Shot Callers would have to actually treat the women well and not just flash a few dollars or ride by on some twenties.  I don’t even want to get into the baby momma/daddy situations that arise from this ignorance.

          • Lynn

            Wrong, wrong, wrong!  See my earlier post to you.

          • Anonymous

            On an esoteric level, you may be right, but for practical purposes the man doesn’t have to show respect to be respected by a woman.  As long as there are women who will sell their souls to be with a man with baubles and diamonds and rings, they’ll pimp themselves out to get next to him.  It is no different than birds with plumage– they strut their stuff to get attention and the one with the biggest wing span or design gets the female bird, or it can watch a battle to see the women peck each other to death over him.

            The irony is that most of the “celebrities” are kidding themselves.  Take the money away from them and what do they have–not a white woman.  The minute things go south, the money dries up or he’s not blinging like he used to, they don’t hang around, and then take half of his money (in California), and then they really go to town!  And it will not likely be a black man they’re with next time around. OJ found that out.  So, whatever… black stars have a shelf life, too.  I am less interested in them, in general.  It’s the Barack Obamas, the Corey Bookers, the Van Jones’s of the world that I look up to now, as a role model that I would seek in a man (in my age range, no less—hey I can still wish.).  Being smart is sexier than entertaining any day of the week.

      • Lynn

        Wrong!  Women are not the “hip hop rappers objective”, KB.  MONEY is.  Women are not the END that rappers have in mind, but rather are the MEANS to the end.  Rappers degrade, exploit, objectify and abuse women to get MONEY, not to win favor with them.  If rappers wanted to win favor with women, then surely they would have paid attention to all the disgruntled women who expressed their unhappiness and discontent with this type of music for the last three decades.  That nobody paid attention to what women felt about it shows you that none of these rappers were doing it for women.  At the root of the choices that rappers are making is the fact that sex SELLS, and unfortunately, the degradation and debasement of women does too. 

        Your argument is just another sorry and pathetic attempt to place the blame for the actions of unaccountable black men on black women.  However,  the logic you use to do it so twisted that I think you might benefit from a brain scan…

        • KB

          I see your point.  The “rappers” goal is money, yes.  Sex sells, yes.  Who wants the sex? – Both men and women,  What do men have to do? – Make that dough, as you said, but they must also flaunt it in front of the women.  I have seen this in every state that I have visited in these United States.  The sad thing is most of the men are just fronting to get the sex.  They don’t really have any wealth.  Some females (I will not say all) can continue to fall for the okie-doke and men will continue to game them.  By the way, people are listening, but actions speak louder than words.  Females can complain, but if they continue to lie down, who really cares about what they say.  But at least they could make the guys where condomes so we can stop producing children that are neglected, develope issue and continue the cycle.  My logic has gotten me very far, while the logic of some women and maybe is not logic at all.  But even if my logic is faulty, if I were able to get stuck with a child by somebody I didn’t know, what some females like to call “blessing” – please believe I would not be flinging the poom like they are doing at an alarming rate to produce so many fatherless children. 

          My logic boiled down = the consequences, just like 1+1=2.  But I’m sure you’ll figure out a way to say that 1+1=2 is not always true.  Go ahead, say that ish, we see what is happening.  Now I am done.  Get the sisters together, go to the club and y’all go make some more “Weezys” to raise by yourselves so more can complain and not keep their legs closed…  But again, the cycle continues. 

          • Marilynn

            Right On KB I’ve been saying the same things to young ladies and young men for some time now. Yes I have 2 daughters and I thank God they listen to their old lady for 1 they are in college and I have no grandbabies to support. yes they like rap music but I’m proud of their choices they make and living with an old school Mom paid off for they like my music as well. I have so many of these arguments with young ladies that I attempt to teach abstinence too.They like to talk about deadbeats they had kids with when it’s simple to me why did they lie down in the first place. these young boys are just that, young boys and because they can ride em all night don’t make them become men or responsible, it  just makes the young ladies a mom before her time and that is not a blessing, for God don’t give a mess he only bless and that’s a mistake no little lady is ready for being a Mom in  her teen years, just like those young men aren’t ready to be a Dad. they don’t know how and they don’t even have a Dad to teach them how. Women get lucky because they always have a mom or a grandmom to carry their weight with them if not for them. Aids is so rampant in our community that they are blessed they if they don’t get that instead of a baby. young ladies he is right keep your legs closed and if you do open them then make sure he’s strapped we don’t need any more kids we need economic empowerment and to lift up our heads and think more of our selves besides being sex queens. enough said .Peace
             

          • Marilynn

            Right On KB I’ve been saying the same things to young ladies and young men for some time now. Yes I have 2 daughters and I thank God they listen to their old lady for 1 they are in college and I have no grandbabies to support. yes they like rap music but I’m proud of their choices they make and living with an old school Mom paid off for they like my music as well. I have so many of these arguments with young ladies that I attempt to teach abstinence too.They like to talk about deadbeats they had kids with when it’s simple to me why did they lie down in the first place. these young boys are just that, young boys and because they can ride em all night don’t make them become men or responsible, it  just makes the young ladies a mom before her time and that is not a blessing, for God don’t give a mess he only bless and that’s a mistake no little lady is ready for being a Mom in  her teen years, just like those young men aren’t ready to be a Dad. they don’t know how and they don’t even have a Dad to teach them how. Women get lucky because they always have a mom or a grandmom to carry their weight with them if not for them. Aids is so rampant in our community that they are blessed they if they don’t get that instead of a baby. young ladies he is right keep your legs closed and if you do open them then make sure he’s strapped we don’t need any more kids we need economic empowerment and to lift up our heads and think more of our selves besides being sex queens. enough said .Peace
             

        • Dedove7573524064

          Thank you Lynn, like I keep saying quoting Bill Cliton, “its theeconomy, stupid!”

    • TalleyG

      I agree with this all the way.

    • Sarah V

      so many of these posts are by people acting holier than thou, all talking like you’re christians but you all sound like a bunch of racist pigs to me, blaming everything on the white person, how about everyone take responsibility for his or her own words and actions, black, white, yellow, red, and ask forgiveness from the lord when necessary

      • Anonymous

        Responsibility is one thing. Consequences are another.  The article is about people in positions of profound influence on who? Black kids.  This is a blog called, “Your Black World.” I wish Christianity were the panacea to all our ills–if it were, then this discussion wouldn’t have to exist. It is the reliance on the after-life that people don’t take consequences into account:  it’ll all get better in the next one.  Sorry, but I’m not buying it.  

  • Corestrength45

    I’m in, Dr. Boyce! Not my genre of music but willing to do whatever necessary to silence this vile creature.

  • Herbcaroll

    I commend U for taking a stand. This kid clearly is a (runaway train) headed for a crash. Too bad he doesn’t look at the big picture, but again nobody has taught him. Take a look at his mentors, they spent so much time without basic necessities when they were young and now that they have aged ( i can’t use the word MATURED) the basics along with other trinkets have become their GOD. They claim to want MONEY but as you can see from Waynes outburst he really wants to matter. Wayne, you may be short in statue and of the minority race but you still MATTER. Not because you made it in hiphop but because you were born period. Once you realize this fact you will have no need to demonize or demoralize black women. After all you are here because fo a black woman……..

  • Jamesmooremail

    I’ve never liked this Lil Not “So Good Looking” fella. I don’t understand why someone would want to support such negativity towards Black women and women in general. There are too many other artist who have better quality music, even in Rap, and is easier on the eyes. Lil ugly MF.

  • Jill

    At the end of the day no matter what, whether it’s music we listen to, or television we watch, we as individuals have to make our own decisions, be responsible for our own actions and not be so easily influenced by the messages that are being delivered. As parents, that’s what we should be teaching our children, to be strong-minded and independent thinkers and people. We all know what is right from wrong, if lyrics from a song can make an individual easily inspired to commit a crime or do other things that they know are wrong from the jump, they need help with their self esteem. In my opinion, a movie or song should not make a strong-minded, independent thinker try to copy what  they heard in a song or saw on a movie. Especially if they know ahead of time that what they are doing or thinking about doing is wrong. Lil Wayne should not be boycotted or blamed. We all can make wise independent choices for ourselves. 

    • Towan_53

      I agree with you wholeheartedly; why single Lil Wayne out? You have to change the mindset of people. He (Lil Wayne) is but one of many besides he says he is going to retire.  

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Denise-Clay/1257851749 Denise Clay

      Thank you Jill! At some point, parents have to be parents and take the responsibility for monitoring what their kids watch and listen to. We have to teach our kids to become more discriminating consumers of media. If we do, they’ll be able to separate the good stuff from the crap. 

    • Balance Seeker

      Thats fine for adults…..but we are talking about our impressionable children…who’s minds are being shaped and are like sponges to what they hear and see.  As adults it is our job to demonstrate good examples and models for them to emulate if we want to preserve and uplift our
      people and help them to carry on our legacy in an upward and progressive direction.  

  • Lakeshiawootentherapy

    I somewhat agree with Dr.Boyce, but we cannot blame all of this on the Artist. I say this because it seems if there are more to creating music than what is percieved by the listners and buyer’s of this music. It’s politics. There are so many well known unrecognized artist that have been very positive in their background and genre of music, and to the open minds of us who know this we don’t judge based on their solecism alone. I  feel based on history and like anything else their is always a link to explain the choice and the actions of our Black musicians. On the other hand, we do have a choice not to sell our souls and to create and recreate the opposition of negativity.

    • Anonymous

      I totally agree Lakeisha. We have to be responsible consumers.

      I believe that young white men look to young black men to find out what is cool. If young black men ditch Lil’ Wayne, young white men will quickly follow and so will the market for it.

      Sigh. I hope we get a clue sooner rather than later!

      Qalil.com

      • KB

        The young black men do what works to get women.  If it didn’t work they wouldn’t do it.  I’m older, 39, but I look younger.  I went to a lounge on the outskirts of D.C. that was for the older crowd.  Never,ever  again!  The women were older (and looked it) but seem to have the same mentality as younger black women.  A Lil’ Wayne song, “I Wish I Could F*** Every Girl in the World” to be exact, and the women got on the floor danced the way they dance – which is not sexy if you’re are not sexy – and recited every single raunchy syllabel.  All I could do is shake my head, hang my head, and leave.  I wrote all that to say this, Yes, black men should be better, but there is no need.  What “we” are doing is working to get what “we” want. Actually if we are better we come up short.  So it is up to the black woman to start choosing the better man.  In order to get a good woman, the black man would have to conform and be a good man.  In turn the white man will see that being a good man is “cool” and…   We know that throwing the black man under the bus is popular – white men do it, white women do it, black men do it, and black women most definitely do it – it is popular, but it has not, does not, and will not work.  This approach has been taken for how long?  Since before the days of our freedom in this country.  Women have the power to change all that is wrong.  I truly believe this and could go on and on and on…  For the record I do love the “music” of hip-hop and R&B, but the lyrics and the reactions that the lyrics get…  well, I have trouble with that.  I don’t even listen to any of the hip-hop nor R&B stations while my children are in the car with me.  Unfortunately, these genres are bleeding over to other stations. 

        • Lynn

          “The young black men do what works to get women.” 

          Quit lyin!!  If they were doing what worked, they’d get a job, get married, and take care of their children.  Bottom line is that they are doing what works for THEM and them alone, not anybody else.  Some women will go along for the ride, but just because they are going along for a hot mess miseducated ride don’t mean they are the ones driving the car…

          • KB

            I think we are on the same page.  I get on the young men in my family in person.  I have never been into the rap music lyrics, the music moves me, but I cannot remember the lyrics for anything, because too much of it is senseless to me.  But I feel that the men are getting much more of the blame in society and I guess I am playing the devil’s advocate. 

            And it does work for the black men and not anybody else – THAT is my point exactly!  The bad black man is driving I agree.  But why does the black woman go for the ride?  If the woman doesn’t go for the ride, we’ll eventually get to the point where we will stop producing children outside of a structure where there is not a positive mother and postive father who do not allow their young children to listen to the damaging songs – thus breaking what has become a cycle of people who really might not know better – Damn, as odd as that sounds to me with my logical train of thought, they might not really know any better.  So you stay on the black men and I’ll stay on the black women, at least until the rest of society catches up to my thinking ;)

          • Lynn

            KB, I don’t think we are on the same page.  You want black women to bear the onus for something they don’t have control over, and definitely don’t benefit from.  I think that people like you want black women to shoulder blame simply to help black men save face.  You feel that everybody is “throwing black men under the bus” when pointing out their failures and shortcomings.  When this happens, men like you run for cover… under black women’s skirts … trying to give us a portion of your own shame.  If you’re ashamed of what black men are doing, then just say so.  But please find somebody else to blame besides black women.  We have enough crap heaped on us as it is without having to bear the burden of black male shame …  Isn’t it enough that black women have to be the creative targets of black male misogyny and contempt before a global audience without us also being told it’s somehow our fault (when God knows it isn’t)?

          • Anonymous

            Go head, Lynn.  I don’t think KB really believes what he’s saying.  I think he’s being provocative.  I can’t follow the reasoning all that well.

          • Dedove7573524064

            I follow his reasoning, I just want hime to know who/what to blame! Its the economy, stupid!, quoting Bill Clinton

          • http://twitter.com/deedeerussell Dee Dee Russell

            You need to quit it!

          • Makarios72

            I am a black man, husband, and father and I agree with Lynn.  Black men are still believing the hype about ourselves.  We are not cool and the myth is dead…  So many of us don’t know how to love, let alone love a black woman.  All we love is our own myths which is continuing to mount up in absentee fatherhood. 

          • Tony, Sr.

            As a black man, I also agree with Lynn.  I’m a proud black PRESENT father of three sons and I think it is disgusting the way KB banters about like a whipped dog – blaming black women for his problems. 

            Seriously, this isn’t about Lil’ Wayne, this is about him and how much he detests black women. 

          • Dedove7573524064

            Its called survival skills; it was a lot worse in earlier centuries; some of the worse indignities ever imposed on a race; and our men, (many of them) were impotent, unable to defend their women, unwillingly compliant, angry, embarrassed and ashamed, taking their self loathing out on each other, hence violence, abuse, alcoholism and addiction. crime, antisocial behavior But many of US,(THE MAJORITY) looking down on THEM, survived, improved ourselves, became aggressive in the work place , protested injustices and improved the lot of MOST of us if not all.  Many still feel helpless and hopeless, are angry and pretty soon will become al queada like rather than just trying to “get over”.God, please bless our peoples and bring us together. Amen. 

        • Anonymous

          How interesting! So you believe that black women have the power to change ALL that is wrong? If you have a blog or could write a short piece on this I would be very interested to hear what your thesis is.

      • Anonymous

        You have a great website, Qalil! Do you have an Internet radio show?  You should consider it.

        • Anonymous

          Why thank you! No internet radio show yet, but keep tuned! You may be pleasantly surprised soon!

    • Makarios72

      The problem I see Lakeshiawootentherapy is that I know what a teenager is like.  (maybe you do too) but teenagers most of the time are looking for some reason to rebel.  Obviously there is a bell curve  that demonstrates 5% on both ends of the spectrum, but most teenagers are at the mercy of these moneymaking-socially unconscious artists.  How do you protect your children without smothering them?  How do you protect them from those who are not being protected, and are enjoying a steady diet of this negativity?!?  This artist is certain symptomatic of a real cultural crisis.

  • Tdhughley

    Why did it take so long for you to come to this conclusion.  This boycott should have happended years ago.  Maybe, we could have saved a generation that is now lost.

    • Victory

      i understand you but do not really agree with you Tdughley. the worst thing  anybody can do is completely demonize a person who is not completely a demon. if you really listened to lil wayne you would know that he has put out good tracks as well such as ‘Gossip’, ‘Misunderstood’, ‘How Can Something’, etc but you may have not heard these songs because they were not promoted on TV or Radio by those who control Media. However to agree with Dr. Boyce when I heard ‘We Be Steady Mobbin’ I wanted to throw up. I am not a defender of Lil Wayne but am just saying really listen to an artist before you totally cast them to the Lions.

      • Celia785

        Not completely a demon? That’s the same as a little pregnant. Either you are or you aren’t. 

      • Makarios72

        I am sorry my dude…  I am with the Dr.  It started for me with The Ghetto Boys.  When I heard the garbage that were saying not only did I not want it in my house I didn’t want it in my neighborhood!!  I am sorry but you have to go with your gut and my gut says this is really really wrong.  I don’t care how successful he is or how much money he makes.  I have to think about my daughters.  Their hearts and emotional well being hare way too important to me.

      • Sickened

        What more do you need to hear from this Flithy, Worthless Bastard!  This sell out will OBVIOUSLY do and Say ANYTHING for money.  There is absolutely NOTHING in his songs–past or present that excuses these lyrics.  Hold this fool to the same standard that you would hold Oprah Winfrey.  She would be crucified if she said something this dangerous about black men.  When will BLACK MEN stand up and be PROTECTORS of their children’s EARS, EYES & MIND?  Lil Wayne (how foolish does his name sound for a so-called Grown Man) is the WORST kind of RACE TRAITOR.  He pumps your children with this garbage while sending HIS children to a SUBurban PREP school and your children are left looking, acting, and sounding like complete UNEDUCATED fools.  All the while, he and his children are laughing all the way to the bank at your Expense!

        Black people need to call out, boycott & distance themselves from their real ENEMIES—Black SELL-OUTS like this!!!

        Lastly, Dr. Boyce why in the hell does Speaking/Standing Up for what’s left of the black community(ie. Black women) break your heart?  And does pimping, murdering, insulting, and demonizing your community constitute Talent, now?  There is not ONE thing about this RACE HATING Bastard that is talented and Shame on you for declaring that he is!

      • DWimbelyeffect

        I agree completely Victory.  Judging our own brothers without sharing with them any way to return to what is right is counterproductive.  Wayne is a talented wordsmith who is still very young and most likely needs a great deal of therapeutic help to deal with the demons that haunt him.

        The music industry is USING him and we need to free him to work on our side for good.  It will only happen if we remember that we all have serious faults SICKENED and Celia (judgmental comments below).  He, like most of our young brothers are struggling to survive mentally and physically.  These industries throw them a life raft, promise them a “better” life when they are at their weakest.

        My son is 11, my daughter 18 and they are NOT weak.  They are able to fight the images and audios fed them, because they are filled with love and grace every day through their support (family, friends – that we CHOOSE).  Don’t blame victims unless you are going to do it in LOVE and help.

        If not you only add to the destruction of our community.  Work TOGETHER.  Please…

        • Pastormw

          Well said. Most of these young black artist have been misguided by either the music industry, which is a modern-day plantation, or from a lack of a father-figure in the home. Love also must be given with balance. This means that we don’t go along with everything that is done, but we also don’t throw the baby out with the bath water. Here is something for you and others to think about when it refers to music that our children listen to: Music is the only thing that enters your spirit without your permission. There are songs that we heard as children that still linger in our spirit (Like the theme to the Brady Bunch or Gilligan’s Island). Our people are perishing for lack of knowledge, of Christ, self, and culture, and because of this we destroy our very own. Lil’ Wayne is not a B……, he’s just misguided and needs direction. Calling him names (Sickened and others) will not lift Lil’ Wayne or anyone else up out of their state, love that is balanced will though.

          • Dedove7573524064

            I keep saying like, Bill Clinton, “its the economy, stupid”! This filth is everywhere, from the pulpit to the door.C’mon y’all. wake up and stop demonizing each other instead of this wicked system we live in. If you live in the U S  of A and have no scruples, the lacking of which you see everyday in the good ol’ U S of A, you do what it takes to get paid, and that goes for evryone on this page! Even the very meticulously, scrupulous, holier than thou, robe wearing, undercover  GLBT, is trying top get paid, so dont put it all on thekids.  Y’all better hear me!

        • Pastormw

          Well said. Most of these young black artist have been misguided by either the music industry, which is a modern-day plantation, or from a lack of a father-figure in the home. Love also must be given with balance. This means that we don’t go along with everything that is done, but we also don’t throw the baby out with the bath water. Here is something for you and others to think about when it refers to music that our children listen to: Music is the only thing that enters your spirit without your permission. There are songs that we heard as children that still linger in our spirit (Like the theme to the Brady Bunch or Gilligan’s Island). Our people are perishing for lack of knowledge, of Christ, self, and culture, and because of this we destroy our very own. Lil’ Wayne is not a B……, he’s just misguided and needs direction. Calling him names (Sickened and others) will not lift Lil’ Wayne or anyone else up out of their state, love that is balanced will though.

      • Pastormw

        Victory, you are partly right about listening to all the songs, but a good tree only produces good fruit. Not artist is ever made to make any track that is played or not played, that’s a choice. Of course the media won’t commercialize the positive because we live in a negative society that buys into negativity. Li Wayne has a lot of book since, bu that type of since will only get you so far. When you have a gift of any kind it should be used to uplift people (especially your own) and not to tear them down.

        • Dedove7573534064

          This negativity is all over the media; it Sells! and promotes negative images for all to see and imitate. And we Watch and Listen, but we seldom listen to positive portrayals of our History. But thank God we have more positive and productive Black Citizens, in spite of  those who use this as a specialty for survival.

    • Lynn

      Yep, it should have.  But it’s only because now people are seeing the effects of this music on the life outcomes of black men that they are speaking up.  When it was about degrading black women, no on gave a *@?^.

      • http://twitter.com/deedeerussell Dee Dee Russell

        You got that right!!

      • Jordan Williams1984

        i also think its because for the longest time, the lines of decency were being pushed. Now those lines aren’t just being crossed, their being leaped over and pissed on. In other words, it’s more obvious now that this stuff is not good.

    • Bahati Sobukwe

      Tdhughley, I was typing the exact same words you said!  Yes, we should have stopped those type of rappers over 30 years ago!!!

    • Whayes8085

      Because he only wants publicity since the BET awards air tonight. He’s a joke like most pseudo black intellectuals.

      • DWimbelyeffect

        What a weak point that has NO solution.  I’m sure you are more intelligent than that.  The point is what are we all going to do about this.  Simple.  Don’t listen to weaponized lyrics in your car or on your television, or in your IPod, etc.  If you have kids, disallow them from listening.  You control you and yours.  IF we each do that we won’t have these issues.

        Dr. Boyce is trying to help.  He is definitely not your issue.  A word of advice, “Do not judge or by the same measure you judge you will be judged.”  Are you a cynical, pseudo intellectual?

        Stay positive.  We gotta fight side by side Whayes…

      • DWimbelyeffect

        What a weak point that has NO solution.  I’m sure you are more intelligent than that.  The point is what are we all going to do about this.  Simple.  Don’t listen to weaponized lyrics in your car or on your television, or in your IPod, etc.  If you have kids, disallow them from listening.  You control you and yours.  IF we each do that we won’t have these issues.

        Dr. Boyce is trying to help.  He is definitely not your issue.  A word of advice, “Do not judge or by the same measure you judge you will be judged.”  Are you a cynical, pseudo intellectual?

        Stay positive.  We gotta fight side by side Whayes…

      • http://twitter.com/Pahlewan2 Bhimsen Kumar

        Really?  Wasn’t it last year that the BET Awards had Li’l Wayne doing a rap about wanting to “love” little girls while on a stage filled with them?   I like my rap fun…I don’t need to be reminded about life on the streets since I lived in them for a short while.

        When Li’l Wayne did that, I dropped BET and the BET Awards like a bad habit.   I switched to TVOne and The Africa Channel because they are more stimulating.  If you have TVOne, check out UNSUNG.

  • Tdhughley

    Why did it take so long for you to come to this conclusion.  This boycott should have happended years ago.  Maybe, we could have saved a generation that is now lost.

  • Anonymous

    May I suggest that you make an effort to expand your boycott into every African American church in America. The boycott campaign should definitely include Lil Wayne’s lyrics, complete and without sugar coating. There might be some push back to presenting these lyrics on the grounds that such extreme vulgarity is too much to be “seen” in a “holy” place like a church.

    However from my experience a large sector of Lil Wayne’s CD sales comes from children whose parents are active members in some black church. These well meaning parishioners most likely excuse themselves from any responsibility by being “deliberately” unaware of the lyrical content of the Rap music that their children listen to continuously. By this I mean that the parents will usually say something like, “Yes I know my kids listen to Rap music but I don’t understand it and I don’t waste my time trying to figure out what they might be saying in all that noise!”

    In order for any boycott to be successful it must include the active participation of black parents who by default are also complicit in the sales of many of Lil Wayne CD’s. 

  • Keithhopps

    We should all boycott this crap.

  • Keithhopps

    We should all boycott this crap.

  • Anonymous

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for supporting Black artists, especially those that are about something positive and definitely into mentoring, but are you kidding me? WHAT TOOK YOU SO LONG?
    This man, I use that term loosely, has been plague in music for a LONG time and you’re just now taking notice?
    Yeah… he should be boycotted, but his foothold is so strong now that it would take quite a bit to get rid of him and his influence.

    • Holmes Cameron

      I completely agree with you! It is sad that one little blog like this slams Lil’ Wayne degrading lyrics, when in actuality, he has been degrading the entire Black community since the beginning of his career. It angers me that ppl like Boyce – although I completely 100 percent agree with – all of a sudden, wants to launche an attack after once “respecting his lyrical capabilities.” I am so sick and tired of ppl making excuses for this sick pest, saying “but he is a really good rapper.” when despite it all, he has been poison in the Black community all along. No public leaders stand up enough, preachers in the communities,  or socially conscious Black feminist seem to stand up to this guy. It is sad and disheartening. 

      • Lynn

        Great point, Holmes.  This poison was being peddled for a long time, by Lil Wayne and lots of others, and very few black male intellectuals had anything critical, if at all, to say about it.  They were too busy watching other black men build their bank accounts, businesses and brands and thinking that because somebody black was getting paid, it must be a good thing. So, black men en masse failed to hold these young men accountable, and instead made excuses (namely the “this is what they live” excuse).  Karma being what it is, black men are the main ones suffering from the proliferation of this ish. Black men didn’t care when it was hurting black women, though: the only care because they see it tearing down black men.  And on top of all of this, they have the audacity to try in some pathetic way to pin this sorry *ss state of affairs on black women…    

      • Anonymous

        They don’t stand up because they are offered radio shows (Sharpton), television guest speaker contracts, and become “entertainment” themselves.  Then they call themselves hiphop explainers (Dyson) and show up on panels talking about rap and hiphop. Steve Harvey crossed over, too. He used to rail against rap, then walked over to the dark side.  
        The way I see it, over the centuries, we black women became their protectors and they feel emasculated by it.  White women see them as men.  And that makes the men feel good.  These ex-brothers could care less about their race.  They’re doing their Cyndi Lauper thing–boys just wanna have fun. 

      • Anonymous

        They don’t stand up because they are offered radio shows (Sharpton), television guest speaker contracts, and become “entertainment” themselves.  Then they call themselves hiphop explainers (Dyson) and show up on panels talking about rap and hiphop. Steve Harvey crossed over, too. He used to rail against rap, then walked over to the dark side.  
        The way I see it, over the centuries, we black women became their protectors and they feel emasculated by it.  White women see them as men.  And that makes the men feel good.  These ex-brothers could care less about their race.  They’re doing their Cyndi Lauper thing–boys just wanna have fun. 

  • Abcd

    Well I used to love Lil Wayne because I was one of the first amoung my friend circle to recognize how long he had been making hits. It was at that time that he proclaimed himself the best rapper and people began to see that I was right. I love feeling that my artists are personal to me, but of course they dont love it or else they could never make the millions, so I couldnt get mad that Lil Wayne became more and more mainstream and although he was never as influential as say Tupac his music became less and less about anything and mostly consisted of what one friend calls ‘snappin’ meaning he is making a lot of quirky similes and metaphors but thats all (” I like to taste that sugar, that sweet low, but hold up wait a minute, new position- I put her on my head, and do the dishes…”) so I have grown tired of that and how “mainstream” he has become. So I quietly have been pulling away as a fan of his and noticed as this site has he makes more than  a few inflammatory remarks. I am so sick of artists wanting to be hard core killers not to mention Rick Ross. I just wonder if others like these artists for their lyrical ability or honesty in their music. Because if it is the latter then we are in serious trouble. I guess the mere fact that one has to ask such a question should be enough to say something has to be done.  Not all children are going to be able to realize that a multi million dollar rapper could never live out such a life of crime. Its sad. But honestly my major reason for ditching Wayne is his disregard and disrespect for dark skinned women. I mean like who you like but I always say I cant play someone elses position and mine, so others might not care, but I am a dark skinned woman and he is not rapping to me at least not anymore. So there goes my ex favorite rap artist.

    • Peachtree124

      WHY BOYCOTT LIL WAYNE? I DONT CARE FOR HIM AT ALL. IF YOU THINK HE IS THE ROOT OF THE PROBLEM IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY YOU ARE SADLY MISTAKEN. NWA, PUBLIC ENEMY, JAY Z, NAS, PUFFY DADDY, BIGGIE AND TUPAC. MADE IT COOL TO BE IN A GANG AND BE VIOLENT TOWARD ONE ANOTHER. WHY ARE U JUST TARGETING A SOUTHERN RAPPER. I AM PRETTY SURE YOU ARE WELL VERSED ON JAY Z HUSTLE TO GET WHERE HE IS AT AND HIS LYRICS. IF YOU ARE GOING TO BOYCOTT, WHY NOT BOYCOTT ALL RAPPERS WHO HAVE DAMAGING LYRICS.

  • Fourplatesplus

    When you say that our young black men follow these lyrics religiously, you hit the nail on the head. Just like religion motivates people to do all sorts of things, lyrics such as these are motivating our black youth to carry behavior that is so destructive. The doctrines taught in this hip hop religion has so badly influenced our youth, especially black males, it seems to have them believing that prison is not such a bad thing, in fact to them its a form of manhood training. They’ve even perverted the use use of the word “Soldier”, soldiers are protectors not perpetrators of crime.and violence. I believe Lil Wayne is a talented,and popular rapper and can use this talent to encourage our youth to be more positive. I too will join you in boycotting Lil Wayne. As a 48 year old black man who has found all types of rap styles entertaining I totally agree that lyric like that is proof that he’s gone a million steps too far.

    • KB

      I totally agree with you on this.  Another problem and maybe even bigger is that women accept this and I think even seek this behavior from these guys.  Then complain about it when the man follows the lyrics to the T.

      • Lynn

        Y’all quit tryin to blame this demonic ish on black women!  Black women are not the ones making this music, or profiting from it.  They are the objects and victims of it, and their images are being dragged to hell in handbasket by it. Quit with the clap trap that “women accept this so men do it.”  It’s totally the other way around: men do it, and unfortunately, some women accept it.  Quit trying to take the onus off of black men for something that is their number one and primary responsibility!  This is the reason that black men have been sucked into a vortex of negativity by this music in the first place: when black women like C. Delores Tucker tried to protest against it, “brothers” were too busy supporting the perpetrators to care about how it impacted black women.  Now this ish has come back to bite a whole generation of black men in the *ss like a muthaf*cka.  And at the end of it all, y’all negroes still gotta try and find a way to blame it on women.  When will you mofos learn?????????????

        • KB

          Now here you go!  Either way you look at it women accept it.  You can play with that “Which came first, the chicken or the egg” and you can burn with the rest of them.  Women “choose”  if they didn’t it would be a lot more men locked up for rape instead of back child support.  It is what it is – coming from a black man with three children by the same black woman and by the way we were married before the first was concieved and we are still married.  Her black butt is trippin’ right now and I’m just waiting for her to roll so she can burn with the rest of y’all.  I’m good.  I don’t need to learn, but Baby you may need to observe.  Look around you.  All of society has thrown black men under the bus from day 1.  Now the black, strong, independent women – who by the way is on WIC or welfare or whatever – is starting to feel the heat and the truth is coming to light…  You know what just burn!

          • Dedove7573524064

            The girls know these lyrics are nothing but money making bull. They are not hoes, they just like to keep their hair and nails done, nicely. Most of these sisters dont take no crap from nobody. Remember I said Most!

          • KB

            Oh.  I get it.  I think.  They are not hoes, they just want to be perceived as hoes.  Who is paying to get the hair and nails “did”?  What are they doing to get someone else to pay for that?  Sorry, I’m lost on this one.

          • Dedove7573524064

            Using this same capitalistic system!
            C’mon KB, you aint stupid!

          • KB

            Thats what I call hoe’n.  If the woman is gonna do it, they should own it.  They shouldn’t get mad and put it on the man when dude gets at a few of their friends.  And as long as the women are giving it up for material things, bad guys will use their materialistic mentalities against them.  I feel that just because everybody else is doing it that does not make it right.  If that were the case I would be out in the streets or in some other woman’s bed right now.  Capitalist values are not Family values.  People need to choose which of those values is the most valuable – If capitalist values are chosen they shouldn’t get made when the supply is much greater than demand.  Which leads to them being bought and then trashed as if they are worth a dime a dozen – because that is what they become.  Think about the consequences of choices then no one should be surprised, no one should complain.  That is all I’m saying.  If they want to be “Bad Girls” own that ish!  Own the consequences!  They need to “Run the World” and shut up already!

          • Dedove7573524064

            I dont see no chicks complaining, but I sho do see a lot of jealous dudes!

          • Lynn

            What the hell are you talking about?  “Just burn”????  There it is, dude.  There it is: you are a flaming misogynist, which explains why you sympathize with another misogynist.  Which also explains why you so desperately want women to be at fault for the actions of black men.  “Just burn”?  Thanks for showing me and everyone else here your true colors, dude.  Please know that your comments about women have ZERO credibility!

          • KB

            Misogynist?  Really?  Dang it.  I thought I was done.  Family oriented maybe, but misogynist?  Getdafuckouttahere with that BS.  If you knew the depth of my love for all women…  I am married and I have female friends that want no strings attached sex (tempting, but I haven’t, yet).  I tell them that even if I “came at them” they should be shooting me down because sex is all that I would offer them.  I tell them to go find a good, responsible man.  Why do I do this?  Because I love them as my friends and I love them as women.  The problem with finding a responsible man is, a responsible man sees the women and then sees her gang of kids (2+), then wonder where the father is.  And it is a no-go because a responsible man sees that she is irresponsible and it would be irresponsible for him to get involved with her.  Sound familiar?  I’m just asking.  So keep your legs closed until you find a responsible man.  Then we rebuild the family.  I do not agree with alot of rappers lyrics, I see it happening though.  It amazes me to see women shaking their “assets” to the songs that they do – not just to the rythm, which I do like – but they are on the floor shaking it AND RECITING EVERY SINGLE RAUNCHY LINE. 

            Men cannot reproduce and accomplish this distruction without compliant women.  If you ever heard my music you would hear a bunch of reggae because they still speak conscientiously.  As I said before I frown upon and do not support such lyrics.  So until you and your cohorts, yeah I’m throwing your a$$ in there with ‘em now, start thinking AND talking AND acting responsiblly, like I said “Just burn!”  You need a light?

    • Dedove7573524064

      They ARE “unarmed” soldiers, fighting their perception of an evil society. Y’all gotta realize that this is the way many young Blacks are thinking.

    • DWimberlyeffect

      Little brothers follow because they are allowed to.  PARENTS must stand up.  The system is in business to make money so they don’t care if its destroying us as long as they get paid.  We allow these weaponized lyrics into our homes, cars, etc. Lil Wayne isn’t our problem, WE ARE.  Handle your kids!  Problem solved!

  • Anonymous

    I think we may be going wrong with this assessment.

    Lil’ Wayne is an average rapper. He is a construct of the entertainment industry and a recent documentary about hip hop Hip Hop: Beyond Beats & Rhymes will show that the rappers have more to offer, more to give, but executives do not want to sell those rhymes because their market (young white men) want those violent lyrics (for whatever reason).

    Don’t get me wrong, I object to Lil’ Wayne and his ilk and their choice to get paid rather than uphold the communities from which they came. But the disease goes deeper or higher than this little puppet. We have to kill the root otherwise it will just spring up again.

    Qalil.com

  • Marcusdavis40

    I agree in terms of a boycott but why now ? why was’nt there a boycott say 15 years ago with this gangsta hip hop nonsense and its demeaning  lyrics? the moment you heard rappers bandishing the N word  all over the place in music movies etc ,demeaning black women ,or comedians doing the same thing  ,black folks should have made a stance back then and boycott all that garbage,  personally i think its a little to late now we as a people should have nipped all this crap in the bud back then.

    • Lynn

      Marcus, it’s only because this ish is tearing down black men (and we got the mass incarceration numbers to prove it) that people are wanting to say something now.  When it was about tearing down black women, all you could hear was crickets chirping…

      • http://twitter.com/deedeerussell Dee Dee Russell

        Co-sign!!

  • Argylek

    While I’ve always been a Lil Wayne fan and even like some of his songs from his ‘rock’ album, he is definitely known to have ghostwriters…. maybe those people need to take a better look at themselves. By the way, Whoopi Goldberg has made a fantastic example of how music affects kids in her WONDERFUL musical production titled White Noise. See it, if you can – it will open your eyes.

    • JJBCC99

      Oh my! The website that 2ysur2ysub shared is truly an eye opener! I was very aware of celebrity interracial relationships, but not to this extent. Viewing the pages full of our celebrity brothers, civil rights leaders, fathers, and some sons, now following this pattern, was very shocking and a bit disturbing for me. I respect everyone’s right to choose who they love and/ or fall in love with, but this demonstrates something far more deeper than that. There is definitely something that needs to be researched and looked into regarding this pattern, because my fear is that our young black girls will suffer and continue to have a complex about themselves, and their value as a worthy companion. I have two sons, and I have a niece. After looking at this, I’m going to have a sit down with my oldest son, just to find out how he feels about black girls/women in general; and clear up any misconceptions and give him my perspective. As a black woman and mother, I want to make sure before he chooses other options, that he has not used media, or stereotypes as reasons to not want a black mate. I just want him to make sure that whomever he decides to make a companion, that it’s based on facts, personal experiences, and his positive relationship with ME…His proud, beautiful, BLACK Mother! Hmmm…I wonder how the mothers of these celebrities feel? Here’s the site again in case you missed it. Don’t let the title hinder you from viewing. http://www.afieldnegro.com/pho

      • KB

        I lived in a foreign country for a number of years in my late teens and early twenties.  I had a conversation with a young lady from that country when she wanted to talk about marriage.  I told her that as a good black man, I felt that it was my obligation to marry a black woman.  I now am ashamed of that statement and sorry for following through with my perceived obligation.  I have two brothers that have married white women, one I know has had marital problems, but not to the extent that I have had with my black wife.  I took pride in treating her as my equal for many years only to hear, “you’re not my daddy, you’re controlling”, this, that, and the other.  You know, all that jazz that sounds like the black woman’s anthem (in America anyway).  After hearing that noise I decided to stopped my money from going into the joint account, closed our joint credit cards that she kept overdrawn – I severed as many financial ties as possible.  Now she knows that she had it good, but I never should have had to go that extent.  So what I’m saying is that black women don’t appreciate it when they luck up and get a good man.  And on the other hand they are surprised when they choose guys like Weezy, R. Kelley, Tupac… and end up getting treated like the women that the artist rap about!   By the way, the last time I went out, a couple weeks ago, I went to a lounge for the “grown and sexy” – an all black crowd, the guys looked fairly presentable, but the women didn’t fit the “grown and sexy”  description – more like “old and unsexy”.  The women were wearing things way too young for their age and their body.  And they were trying to still “drop it like it is hot” and please believe “it” is not hot.  None were carrying themselves like women.  Like they were trying to hold on to their youth – I wish they would use the gym for that.  Anywho, as you have wisely written that you will talk with your son, but please don’t be surprised by his pespective because I am sure that he is not only seeing these black women “act out” on T.V.  but also in his everyday life.

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Denise-Clay/1257851749 Denise Clay

          So let me ask, does your wife work? I ask this because if she doesn’t, she’s going to have a tough time taking care of your kids if you’re not giving her any money.

          • KB

            I got that covered Ms. Clay.  The only reason I am still around is because of them.  They come first at all times. 

          • A Happy Black Family

            Hopefully you don’t have any daughters.  They don’t need to know how much you hate black women.  That would be awful for them and vile and disgusting of you.  Wow, then we wonder why black women have an image problem.

        • Tony, Sr.

          I accidentally pressed liked on your comment, when I actually hate it.  As a black man, you are a disgrace.  Stop blaming ALL black women for your failed marriage and stop hating on them.

          My first marriage to my black wife was a disaster; however, my 2nd marriage to my wife (who is a black woman) has been a dream come true.  I didn’t blame everyone or all black women for the disaster of my first marriage  – how STUPID does that sound??

          I don’t make a ton of money, but she doesn’t complain.  We work hard TOGETHER and raise our children and keep a happy peaceful household.

          Luckily, you are in the minority, and seriously, black women need to stay as clear from you as humanly possible.  You are worse than any KKK member and worse than the most vile racist because it’s directed against your own (especially knowing full well what we’ve gone through historically as black people). 

          Stop blaming all black women for your misfortunes!  By the way, you stated that you had a brother married to a white woman – and also going through marital problems.  It seems that white women are NO picnic either.

          By the way, I’ve been to Washington DC and there are a lot of beautiful sisters there – seriously.   Maybe there are not attracted to you either?

          Wow! Yet another black man who puts down black women…unbeliveably banal and disgusting.

          • Tony, Sr.

            Pls excuse any grammatical errors, I was so disgusted by KB, that I didn’t perform a spell check.

  • Peaceeternal

    The beloved elder, Barbara Reynolds, wrote an article about this low-life, and other enemies of African people in a truly informative article in 2009 entitled:Black Leaders silent as black rappers Create environ of death and abuse
    Please, google it.

    • Lhall1016
      • Lhall1016

        Black Leaders Silent as Black Rappers Create Environ of Death and Abuse

        • HYPOCRITE CHASER

          I think its insane and ignorant for any one to try to place blame on an entire genre or a single artist for the state of an entire race. Wayne’s lyrics are on fire, and his beats are hot. If your child is too stupid to understand that he shouldn’t murder someone and mail her body to her boyfriend, then you are probably not the best parent in the world.
           Wayne isnt one of the top artists in the world for no reason, and im sure Dr Boyce is still beatin  “i am not a human being” in the old mp3 player.
           Ignorant black ppl have existed just as long as ignorant white ppl, mexicans, and so on.
           This high horse sop box shit is silly and will accomplish nothing.
           If anything it will get him more (well deserved) sales when you bring attention to a song (and album) that will win many awards for  being edgy and artistic. Vulgar? Yes. Yrtistic? Yes. entertaining ? Yes. Hot? ON FIRE!
           Remember that we live in a free country and efforts to tell others what they can and cant listen to is a communistic way of thinking.
            Find a more positive way to try to help your cause other than you r little witch hunt here. Wayne is NOT responsible for your ignorant children shooting each other and committing crimes that get them sent to jail.
           THEIR PARENTS AND ENVIRONMENT ARE.
           Wayne didnt create those environments or raise those children.

          Now how many ppl posting agro pro black bullshit on this page listened to lil wayne today? raise your hand!  :) raises hand

          • http://www.facebook.com/djrussh Rus Tha Docta Cordova

            He plants bad seeds all over the world though and with the level of influence he has, he has chosen to be irresponsible and destructive to his people and THAT HE WILL BE ACCOUNTABLE FOR!

          • HYPOCRITE CHASER

            Is his intention to plant bad seeds or is it art? Its funny that people can take the color of a persons skin and make it into so much more than it really is to try to make their points.
             People arent rallying against the writers of Jason Voorhies , or Freddie Kreuger…..They depict even worse, more graphic violence.
             Some how i’m thinking that he is expressing himself in a way than many ppl actually relate to for whatever reason….
             The lyrics referred to in this “forum” are obviously an analogy and done in a way that not only raises eyebrows, but makes people talk about and listen to it .  Damn near the definition of creativity.
              I guess my entire point is how do you single out one person and give them the scapegoat hat for all of the things that make “black america” what it is?
             You cant! 
                Kanye is hangin out with dead chicks that he supposedly killed in his latest video! Lets boycott him too!.
            Eminem killed dre, his ex, his mom, and even himself in his music and won several awards for his creative depiction of his own imagination. I.E. things that go through his head.
              ITS MUSIC!

  • Hollyhock60

    The premise is good, but how many people who buy his music will actually will read your article?  Boycotting him is good, but not enough.  Can there be some sort of effort to talk to him and get him to see the error of his ways; which may actually result in him making music with worthwhile lyrics? His appearance actually displays just how screwed up his mind is.  He needs professional therapy to get over his past so he will be ale to accomplish something to be proud of instead of spewing the horrors of death and destruction he does now. Then, after you get him straight, there should be and effort to stop all young black men and teens from wearing their pants below their ass and walking around like a bunch of penguins so their pants don’t fall on the ground.  What type of brain washing is going on in the black communities that makes our young people act so crazy!?!

  • DMO

    For one he’s an “ok” artist that says a bunch of things that don’t make sense. I’ve never been a Lil Wayne fan, while all he did was sit in the background like a good lil boy when Juvenile, and Mannie Fresh were building Baby’s wealth and label. Now all of a sudden since they cut them off because of greed Wayne is the best that ever did it? NOPE! All Wayne talks about on “every” song he puts out is his gang affiliation, money, disrespecting women, or how he’s the best that ever did it. The fact that these kids are following a vocal gang member that makes all these fake young thugs think being a Blood, having babies in every third woman, and killing your own people is entertainment is sickening. You got these idiotic grown men wearing flags from their jeans being killed because they have no clue what it means. If you don’t know what it represents, know your knowledge, or just stupid enough to be part of neighborhood terrorists (that’s all they are), you deserve every bullet sent through your skull. Be a man not a mistake!

  • Envyslim

    I disagree. This is why you have to be a responsible adult to listen and be able to decider what is real and not real. Those that listen to it like it for whatever reason music is just like any other art, an expression of feelings or a method to entertain the imagination. What ever happen to freedom of speech. Those that are influenced and go out to corrupt because of Wayne that just goes to show you have little self control.

  • Misshavana

    I am in total agreement that Lil’ Wayne has gone too far.  I won’t buy any of his records.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LOELPS6SE5GV5MVTAWIG5T5YQE bigmamamuley

    To Dr. Boyce, and the Black community: It is not just Lil Wayne, that is destroying Black America, but others, like Russell Simmons, Jay z. and Puff Daddy, who has made millions of dollars denigrating Black people, by referring to us as N’s. Take a bus ride or a subway, and you will think that you are in a room, full of kkk members. It’s N, this, and N, that. How is a person supposed to know that this is not an attempt to denigrate you personally?
     
    You don’t hear Puerto Ricans, calling themselves Spic’s. You don’t hear Italians calling themselves Guineas or Wops, or Daggos. But you hear all of them now calling everyone N’s. Bill Cosby was dead right. I wouldn’t talk to, or shake the hand of Russell Simmons, nor that of any of the scum, such as formerly listed above. They have destroyed the Black youth of today. Is there any wonder, why the black unemployment rate for young people is so high. Who the hell wants to hire, a pants dragging, foul mouth, disrespectful, wannabee gangster, who knows more about beating and stabbing someone, and can recite a stupid rap record backwards, but can’t put two sentences together?  You can try to blame this on Obama, or use any other excuses you want, but it is nobody’s fault, but our own doing. As for the idiots, that says words don’t kill, people kill. that quote is stupid. If you are raised up to believe that killing your own people, and disrespecting women is OK, because you heard it from multi million dollar Black Pimps, who are to today’s youth, just as powerful, if not more than Black ministers, it is indeed those words, that has brain washed and killed.

    • Holmes Cameron

      PREACH! Totally agree!

      • Dedove7573524064

        Y’all need to stop blaming niggas and begin blaming tnis evil, capitalistic society.

        • Anonymous

          With a name like “nigga” why not blame him?  The derogatory term is meant to degrade and he’s pointing to himself calling himself a “nigga.” So why not?  He chooses to be bad. He gets the blame. 

          • Deove7573524064

            So the real culprit excapes, (again) and we continue to blame each other and the situation worsens. Again I say, its the conomy, stupid! Its the Love of Money which is the ROOT of ALL evil. get it?

          • Anonymous

            If a man shoots a gun and kills a child, we cannot prosecute “the system.” We are suffering Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome, as a people (get the book – written by a Black professor – it’s eye opening), but that does not destroy self-determination and will.

    • Jazzybest

      I agree with most of what you say but I put a bigger blame on parents.  Media does have an impact for sure but I think if parents are more involved and screen the trash our children will come out for the better. Not easy these days with hyper social networking but possible if you learn the environment and put some controls around it. I do it on itunes, facebook, ..etc.

  • walter

    Little Wayne is like a test tub baby.He is not for real. No education slick mouth stright hood rat.He can only say or rap about what his syrup brain can give him.

    • Dedove7573524064

      C’mon Walter; this is what sells and this is what the white capitalists, push on our community!

      • Anonymous

        The revolution will never hit, here, my brother (or sister).  We are in the minority and would be slaughtered if we even thought of revolting against the system.  Our power is in our dollars, however.  And we need to start flexing it in the marketplace. 

    • Anonymous

      He knows that what he does is wrong, which is why he says, “I am not human.” something Whites can really jump on, as it goes to [SOME] their very beliefs about us, on a deep level

  • BabyDoll

    I was done a few years ago when he sang ” I just want to f_ _ k all the girls in the world” and had several women pregnant at that time. So disgusting!!!!!!!!!

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Denise-Clay/1257851749 Denise Clay

      Wow. What an idiot. Personally, I was done when he made some off the wall comment about how ugly black women were or some such. I found it funny that this was coming out of the mouth of yet another man who is so ugly that you’d have to tie a pork chop around his neck for the dog to play with him!

      • Anonymous

        That is the problem.  We have taken on the white man’s view of what is ugly and find our own culture wanting in beauty.  Usually, guys like Lil Wayne and Dennis Rodman’s looks were disparaged by us black women, and they fight back in retaliation.  The Nerds rule, and Lil Wayne, is probably angry at us for rejecting him.  I will never call a Black person ugly, for that matter, a human being.  We are all beautiful.  I know you were just cracking a joke, but those jokes go deep into our consciences and can destroy our self-image.

        • http://twitter.com/deedeerussell Dee Dee Russell

          Nope. Black women are not to blame those dudes are CLOSET CASES hate women just looking for an excuse to bag on a sis!

  • JOseph

    I am a 42 year old Black man who was there from the beginning of rap going commercial. I hate, let me say it again- hate where rap is heading. With all the problems facing our community and an economy that Is hurting us more than any other group, rap artist do not give a damn how it sends a terrible misogynist message to our young people. I will no longer listen to music that sends that “get money or die trying message” while the Black man continues to fail his community and his family! When are we going to learn that it’s not just entertainment! Young men live and breathe this self hate. We have enough OGs and thugs and excons- we need doctors, lawyers, architects, urban planners, nurses- do you get the picture!!

    • Makarios72

      This is so very true!!

    • Dezzy

      I commend you to the HIGHEST OF HIGH dear Joseph, as your words reign so very true.  God bless you for sending a much needed message to all.  I ask that ALL will read, believe, and received it………..

    • http://twitter.com/Pahlewan2 Bhimsen Kumar

      TRUE ON ALL LEVELS.

    • Pastormw

      Amen JOseph! Our prison system and graveyards are filled with our people who have either followed this misconception, or led in it. Tookie Williams (former leader of the Crips) came to grips with this while in prison, but they quickly killed him, not realizing that when you kill a man you can never kill the spirit. He could have done more from prison to change these young-ungroomed mentalities then he could executed! It’s time that we not only stop purchasing music that degrades and destroys our worth, but that we stop supporting it with dialogue.

      • Dedove7573524064

        Again, I say, to quote Bill Clinton; “its the economy stupid”! Its not the rappers, its not the gang bangers; it is the racist judicial. educational and political, economic conditions of this country. Doesn’t seem that anyone is getting this.

        • http://twitter.com/deedeerussell Dee Dee Russell

          Nope, it’s the rappers! Uncle Tom sell-outs!

    • Dedove7573524064

      You’re hating the wrong thing and the wrong people: You should hate this genocidal capitalistic SYSTEM!

  • Celia785

    When was hip hop ever good? I little poison? A lot of poison in one bite? Neither is good. Both end with the same results.  

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Denise-Clay/1257851749 Denise Clay

      My suggestion to you is that you check out some of the late 80s-early 90s hip-hop. Pay close attention to the Native Tongues, Boogie Down Productions, Public Enemy and the like. You might also want to see what’s going on underground in your city. I know that here in Philly our underground churns out a lot of really good stuff. But then again, we can’t even get the Roots on the radio here, and they’re from Philly, something that disgusts me on a pretty basic level.

  • Forevernprayer

    We as black ppl can no longer support stupidity or support black ppl just because their black. Black don’t mean conscious.

  • LDYMS78

    When will people start to take personal reasonability for their children and the actions of their children? What happen to the good old days of being a parent and instilling morals and values into your children and teaching them right from wrong? What happened to telling your child “NO” and knowing who your child’s friends are and what that family was about. I get so sick of people making excusing for parents not doing their job and making entertainers the scape goat for all of society’s issues. They are entertainers and that’s what their job is to do put on a show and say things to make their bank accounts grow. In regards to the whole Nelly and when he swiped a credit card through a woman’s backside issue. Did anyone care that it was her idea or that she was paid for her services and she didn’t care? However the women of Spelman took a stand and boycotted something that was meant to save a life, so I guess the card in the ass was more important than helping to save lives. On a side note if you have ever been to Spelman you will know that all those ladies do not conduct themselves as ladies all the time.  It just amazing me how all the negative gets light then some of the positive things people do. 

  • Anonymous

    and the poor sister Diamond – does she really believe the ‘only ‘ youth listening to Lw’s crap are -college age????It may not be about ‘her’. It’s the less “brainy” folk who need to wait until they at least have a -childhood phase

  • Rfhunlimit

    I felt this way years ago… A young man I was privileged to mentor for a season, at the tender impressionable age of thirteen that was a huge fan of LW… I would explain to him and his mother why LW was inappropriate for such a young man to listen to, only to have my words fall on deaf ears… This young man eventually was allowed to mentor himself and as the years passed he did just so until finally ending up in a juvenile penitentiary where he killed himself… Im not saying listening to LW killed this young man but it could not have help his outlook on life…

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_L7ONMGPITX2AX7HEXKFV56TZOU JellyBean

    It is people like Lil Wayne who have ruined hip hop and made our black youth so messed up. Glad you are boycotting this guy now we gotta make our voices heard on a larger scale.

  • Sansalcots2000

    What is tragic is he has another rhyme that says “He chose to be a gangster but hopes his sons make better choices”.  So who’s going to point them in the right direction?  

    • Hqkei

      Thats one of my favorite lines by wayne. Give the man his props and stop being a old ass lame attempting to sound smart. You are probably one of those people who got yo ass beat in high school every day. Now you got hatres bottled up. Go raise your grand kids and get yo old ass off the internet.

  • Michael

    Those lyrics are very disturbing.  Our brother, along with all those hypocritical bishops that mess with or defends messing with boys have sold their souls to the devil.  America has fallen.

  • Dedove7573524064

    Not rationalizing or justifying Lil Wayne’s lyrics, but we really need to explore the anger, the hostility and resentment many young blacks have toward white oppression and black hypocricy. Our lack of empowerment to attain social justice, motivates many of us to use impotent but inflamatory lanquage to compensate for our failures in this society that has the wealth, the ability, the resources, and enough concerned citizens to erase the inequities that exist, not only in the good old U S of A, but in the world. WE should challenge the blasphemous, profane and wicked billionaires and millionaires who allow hunger, disease, poverty, aggressive, larcenous wars and oppression to continue just for their selfish interests. Our anger is displaced.

  • The Solution

    over 27 million likes on fb.. that’s a small U.S. city

  • http://www.mosquitonet.com/~prewett/ John Prewett

    Dr Boyce, I salute your integrity.
    It’s not a racial issue.  For decades many White’s [mostly Christian] have opposed and criticized many White entertainers for spreading mental poison.   Satan is “god of this world”.   Until one knows that,  then one doesn’t know what is going on and one’s anger will surely be “displaced.”     The Satan serving “elites” at the top of this world’s totem pole,  running this world,  are not the least bit “race/color loyal.”

  • Hkq

    They should have never gave you old ass bitter ass people access to the internet. You all sound fucking ridiculous. Lil wayne is simply making music, he does not mean nor does he carry out the shyt he says. Al Green and Marvin Gaye made songs about fucking hoes anf you old hoes glorify them. Lil wayne makes songs about his upbringing and his life and you fuk heads call him a demon?? You people are worst than the idiots who burned Joann at the stake because they called her a witch. Leave the man alone and go fight racism. Im sure you people have perfect lives right and are blue prints of what a black person should be right?? Yea I didnt think so. Boyce you are a dumb ass uncle tom. Go to your nearest AARP office and do something constructive you old ass fucks.

    • Lynn

      Hkq, you and your mentality are a humongous part of the problem.  The people on this thread who want to throw the problems surrounding rap music on the shoulders of the mules and scapegoats of the world — i.e., black women —
       should actually be looking more closely at people like you.  You have the nerve to call Dr. Boyce an “Uncle Tom” — which is synonymous with being a sellout — just because he is standing up against vile, toxic, destructive, and poisonous music that is leading black men like rats following the pied piper into prison cells and early graves??  Are you crazy??  Do you even care about the impact of the lyrics Dr. Boyce quotes?  Do you even acknowledge that they have an impact?  Do you understand that the real sellout and “Uncle Tom” is not Dr. Boyce, but the rapper that you are defending?  If you don’t realize this, will you please go somewhere and look up the definition of MISEDUCATED?

      You say “Lil Wayne is simply making music.”  Are you serious?  When you rap about pimping a woman, making her steal, then murdering her and sending her dead body back to her boyfriend, there is not a d@#* thing SIMPLE about what Lil Wayne is doing.  Lil Wayne is programming minds on a conscious and/or subconscious level to fulfill a demonic mindset, not “simply making music”, dude.  Lil Wayne is — along with others like him — helping to fill the mass/collective consciousness of black men with a profane masculine archetype…an archetype that abuses and destroys the feminine, as opposed to uniting with, protecting and honoring it.  This is a part of a larger problem not only in our community, but with humanity as a whole…  Black men are in a deep sleep and don’t understand that they have been co-opted in the most sinister ways.  The divine masculine does not rape, prostitute, exploit or abuse feminine energies; like the Archangel Michael, the divine masculine prototype PROTECTS the feminine.  That black men are oblivious to the negativity they are consuming, defending, and acting out is sad, sad, sad, sad, SAD!

  • Julian

    No young people come to this website…… So your argument is null. Get off the internet and go help the young then. Stop talking and start acting. I know one thing is for sure… Stop blaming our state on rap. That is getting old, it kind of reminds me of the black “man” blaming his shortcomings with his children on his own father not raising him. Excuses, excuses. How many more decades will we blame rap for OUR children?? Almost 3 decades have passed already. Seems that Dr. Boyce and you all are giving the “white community” another crutch for our shortcomings in the area of parenting. Stop blaming “Artists”. Are our children really that much more impressionable than white children that we jus blame our own blacks on tv for what our children do. I hope my coworkers do not see this post. A black man “hanging” another black man out for the vultures to come. Crazy how history repeats itself huh?

    • Dedove7573524064

      Now, thats what I been talkin’. Can we really blame Lil Wayne for our troubles?  Thats the kind of crab pulling crab mentality that keeps us where we are, DOWN!

      • Lynn

        You got it all wrong.  Boyce isn’t the crab; he’s trying to lift people up, not pull people down.  It’s people like Lil Wayne who are the crabs: they are trying to get out “the barrel” on the backs of everybody else no matter what the cost.  Worse still, once crabs like him get far enough out the barrel they douse it with gasoline and throw a match on it without ever bothering to look back… 

        (Translation: the black community is the barrel, and people like Lil Wayne don’t care if it goes up in flames just so long as he gets paid…)

        • http://twitter.com/deedeerussell Dee Dee Russell

          self hating black men and absentee dads have ruined the black community always making excuses for themselves!

        • Dedove7573524064

          Sorry Lynn, Its not Lil Wayne sending us up in flames; we’re the culprits,.Just remember what former Pres.Clinton said “its the economy stupid”, The Love of money is the ROOT (the cause) of ALL evil. Folks wanna get paid, from the pulpit to the door, from the editors to the readers. Rather than enlightening ourselves, we prefer bickerin my prayer is that we bring ourselves together through self and societal awareness.

  • Sickened

    Dr. Boyce why in the hell does Speaking/Standing Up for what’s left of the black community(ie. Black women) break your heart?  And does pimping, murdering, insulting, and demonizing your community constitute Talent, now?  There is not ONE thing about this RACE HATING Bastard that is talented and SHAME on YOU for declaring that he is!

    Wish our so-called educated stop being afraid of these low-life thugs and start being real men and stand up for your communities!

  • Herbcaroll

    I will bet that this little person can’t read a note of music and actually most hiphop artist are mere poachers and copycats who have no real talent not in music for sure, maybe the ability to rhyme well but so can other poets and even auctioneers. U haven’t done anything so great. Tupac was a real rapper because he had socil awareness and broad knowledge. All this little guy or his so called adopted dad can speak on is downgrading women and how much cash they have. I will leave with this thought” Dress a monkey in a tux and what do you have………” a monkey in a tux. Give an idiot a microphone and ……you have an idiot with a microphone…Why would u expect to get some profound fact or wisdom from an idiot?

  • Julian Jones

    No young people come to this website…… So your argument is null.
    Get off the internet and go help the young then. Stop talking and
    start acting. I know one thing is for sure… Stop blaming our state
    on rap. That is getting old, it kind of reminds me of the black “man”
    blaming his shortcomings with his children on his own father not
    raising him. Excuses, excuses. How many more decades will we blame rap
    for OUR children?? Almost 3 decades have passed already. Seems that
    Dr. Boyce and you all are giving the “white community” another crutch
    for our shortcomings in the area of parenting. Stop blaming “Artists”.
    Are our children really that much more impressionable than white
    children that we jus blame our own blacks on tv for what our children
    do. I hope my coworkers do not see this post. A black man “hanging”
    another black man out for the vultures to come. Crazy how history
    repeats itself huh?

    • Lynn

      Young people don’t have to come to this website for Dr. Boyce’s argument to matter.  He’s speaking not only to the the young people, and to Lil Wayne; he’s also speaking to Lil Wayne’s record company, and other corporate profiteers who promote music that is destructive to the black community.  They need to hear what Dr. Boyce has to say; somebody has to show that they care, or people will keep making this kind of detrimental music.

      You say that Dr. Boyce is “hanging another black man out for the vultures to come.”  That’s the same mentality that’s allowed this music to be produced for decades without anybody standing up to it: it’s been given a pass because “another black man” is making it.  Somewhere, somehow we have to stop giving passes to people with black faces because “another black man” is living large off of the moral, ethical and spiritual destruction of the black community.  And why shouldn’t Lil Wayne be hung “out for the vultures to come?”  Why should he and his no account *@?  be protected and not the future of our children and community??? What did he do to deserve anybody’s loyalty, or silent complicity in the damage that he — and people like him — are doing?  Martin Luther King said it best when he said that all it takes for evil to prevail is for good people to be SILENT.  Keep giving Dr. Boyce the advice you’re giving, and that’s exactly what’s going to happen….

    • guestestwitthebestest

      I would like to second what Lynn said and add that you cannot rehabilitate children without rehabilitating their parents and other adults who support sheparding them into adulthood.

      I am a single mother and in my home we listen to music from Miriam Mikeba to Pavarotti and read books from Wole Soyinka to Shakespeare, we enjoy entertainment from exibits at our local museums and galleries to Shakepeare in the park, we have discussions on topics from Nitchze to Lil’ Wayne, we fraternize with people from Rabbis to nubian-locks wearing, little girls in our neighborhood, and we listen to and love hip hop, yet I do not allow certain “hip hop” to be played in my home.  That does not stop my children from being exposed to it when they get on the school bus and the bus driver is blasting ass shakin’, violence glorifying music as she transports impressionable minds to school.

      We do not exist in a vacuum and that is okay.  It is our job to carefully discern what is harmful and be rid of it, policing the influences that seek to reach our children and destroy them.  There is an agenda to destroy us from McDonalds, which I do not feed my children, (opting for nutritious natural and organic selections that I can prepare with care, yet they eat Mickey D’s when they visit my parents’ home), to the many institutions that make up our society and our government.

      Lil’ Wayne, the man, deserves our attention and our support as we strive to rehabilitate ourselves.  But, the businessman that is Lil’ Wayne, deserves to be boycotted.  A boycott is not a slight against a person, but an action against a commodity that we refuse to support financially because that commodity is not appropriate for us.  There is power in the dollar and extreme power in withholding it.

      And it is more than alright to have standards.  It is perfectly acceptable to enforce those standards, ensuring that our citizens adhere to them, and if not, are either penalized or given the opportunity to transform their lives.

      It sounds like we want the same thing: for Afrikans, at least in the west, to be free.  What we need to understand is that we all bring a perspective, no matter how different, to the table and if we can respect that and pool together our tangible and mental resources, we can accomplish that.

      We need not one man or woman, but many with different experiences and expertise to reach one goal.  The problem we face is multifaceted, we need to be a unified machine made of multitalents.  There is a place for the scholars, the economists, the farmers, the linguists, the artists, the politicians, the spiritual leaders, the physicians, etc.

      But what we all need to understand is design and production, much in the way an architect does.  The goal is to build a house, or nation, with sturdy walls, able to sustain living.  The task is to draft a plan that can be executed by a team working toward that one goal.  No architect would include some guy or girl that wants to destroy his blueprints or burn down his project.  Destruction has no place in nation building.

      Freedom, the way it has been defined for us, the right to do this, the right to do that, has proven, generation after generation, to be, in many specific ways, destrimental to society.

      I often think about this poet, I don’t remember much of the specifics of his story, not even his name, but he went to a country that does impose censorship laws on its citizens, and he was to give a public reading of his work.  There were things that, by law, he was restricted to say, but, he met the challenge by editting the poems.  In the end, he kept the work the way it was after the edit because they turned out to be more powerful that way.  He had to find a way to say what he wanted without saying it blatantly and it was an improvment.  Sometimes, restrictions cause us to be better, deeper, versions of ourselves.

      And one last thing.  You are right, all children are impressionable.  The reason why we must look at the imaging that happens, not blame, but stay abreast of and police, is because children are impressionable.  And the programming — double entondre — that urban youth receive has a different message, different mood, different tone, different command than their white or affluent counterparts.

      My favorite show right now is Vampire Diaries.  I watch it religiously, and I’m okay with that because I love vampires.  But, that does not mean that I don’t notice an almost all white cast filled with characters that are all high school students who are sexually active, who drink at the local bar or often pass around alcohol and drugs at teen gatherings and all their parents are dead or get killed.  Uh, they are raising themselves and the progamming that is happening communicates, to an impressionable white mind, or impressionable black mind that covets what white teens have, that it is sexy.  It is sexy and mysterious, alluring to have dead parents, to have a dead boyfriend, to be dead, and to party like it’s 1999, if you are not dead.

      The media/entertainment industry is a powerful tool, glamorous, and impressionable children of any race might immulate what they see, hear, feel, trying to recreate that magic.  We must be in control of what magic they sprinkle over our children.  That is all.

      • Anonymous

        beautifully written.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1478477705 Marshel Crittenden-Taylor

    I was a hip hopping rappers delight and a reggae mommy!  Then I started hearing the lyrics and I knew that is not what we orginal beboppers were suppporting.  I saw hip hop die a fast death to sell soda drinks, makeup, cars and etc.

    I am 42 and pride myself on not judging things that I have tried but this is mostly music that does more harm than good!

    My young sisters and brothers no matter what color stop letting the rap gang define who you are!!!

    • Anonymous

      Hollywood consciously tames the Black bad boy celebrities: “Mr. F_ _ _ the police, IceT, is playing a cop).  Ice Cube, Mr. Serious rapper, is Mr. Family man comedian.  We all get co-opted when money comes our way. I’ll have to self-publish my book to say what I want to say, unfiltered–but what happens when whites start reading it…. or if a publishing company advances me $50K to write my next book?  Will I change my tune? I’m not sure.  But it’s hard to be angry at a person who’s making you rich.  And that is called “Controlling the Black Masses.”  Here we are, sittin’ in the kitchen, bemoaning the system. Write what you feel and get it out there.  Call in to shows, telling them not to play Lil Wayne! One complaint is worth 3000 in advertising… so start asking them not to play Lil Wayne.  I’m going to send this whole discussion to my nieces who love rap (thanks to my brother).  

  • talleyg

    I admit I listen to Lil’ Wayne; but had never heard (or was able to decipher) the above lyrics.
    I think it is time for me to cease & desist on this tip.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FNL4MCLJ5D6F34ZU2Y2RB2RJ5M Tyrone

    Deep Down, Black Boyz, CRAVE, a damn white girl!   Yeanin’ so deep, them Roots be like Stallion!  Lil Wayn,   knew that!
    Lotta Brotha, bangin that shit, liked damn Gangsta!
    Like PUBLIC ENEMY, JAY Z, NAS, PUFFY DADDY, BIGGIE AND TUPAC, Niggaz bang them whiite girlz,  sweet  Gangsta Shit!  TRUST ME!  White Girls lov that shit! 
    A Black Man, I  admit,  knocking my damn, Root, down a lotta sweet white girls!  Them sweet white bitches got GOOD pussy aaa pussy!   Had my damn  Roots So HARD!  Angry Black Man,  bang them Angry Roots  so Deep Down,  I fuel Deep  fraustating shit,  like sweet ass Nigga!  Noting like sweet piece of pussy, knockin up deep Black Opressions!
     Like Martin Luther King, used say, Let Freedom Ring!

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Denise-Clay/1257851749 Denise Clay

      What in the hell are you talking about?

  • http://twitter.com/glassran Chance Furlong

    You are an idiot. I hate you and everything you stand for.

  • Jerry

    Just a little too late i am afraid

    • MLiza

      It’s never too late if one sincerely wants to make an impact for change and for rewtoration.  But what it takes is a real plan of action — not just talk.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_73CIKYA25XJQN4I3WN5CX6JTCU LEROY A

    Dr. Boyce you disappoint me, why does it break your heart to boycott a person who says the things about black people and mostly women. It does not matter what color you are, thats the trap we are in now, if we do not stand up for dignity, honor, and truthfulness we are going to keep producing these self hateing hip hop roaches who prey on black people. I do not see why you say you love hip hop it has done nothing for us black people but made our young people love the ghetto and being proud of living a substandard life. Hip hop and crack has made our communities a dump with people of the same color not being able to trust each other. Dr. Boyce you need to stand up for something more than hip hop.

    • guestestwitthebestest

      Oooh, I agreed until you got to the part about hip hop.  Hip Hop has a rich and varied history and influences so much more than Afrikans in the west.  It is one of the last ties, in its purest forms, that link us with our kin across the globe.

      Hip hop does not promote self hating, but, the puppets like Lil Wayne who want to “come up” so they turn to the companies who love to mass produce and funnel grime into the urban core to then make money, are far more responsible than the art itself.

      What I think the original post is trying to do is maintain a kinship, becasue kinship is paramount between us (or, protect himself), with the “brother” while simultaneously saying what that brother is doing is harmful.

  • Rgilda5

    Dr. Boyce, when you invited me on your show I gave you my book “Arrested Development: The State of Black Achievement and Education in Hip-Hop America,” which I wrote in part exactly about what you’re saying. Only back in 2006,  the culprits I pointed to were Jay-Z (who has since evolved into a more responsible and conscious individual attitudinally toward women) and Kanye West, who is still a fool. I need to report that on June 24 six young people were randomly shot and killed in Newark, New Jersey, which has become the murder capital of America and I know you check out 98.7 Kiss FM’s “Openline,” with Mtume, Bob Slade and Brother Pickett. They had a mother on the show this Sunday, whose 13-year-old son was senselessly murdered. The destructive nature of Hip-Hop music has reached a crescendo that as l talk about in my book is “capitalism supporting racism and racism supporting capitalism,” a term coined by former Black Panther James Boggs, and Black people have fallen for it hook line and sinker. We’re about to be an extinct people, if as a race we do not demand and boycott these artists and record labels that allow them to spew such FILTH. This is a sad day in  Black America to see what this race has evolved into.  JUst SAD. Peace.   Gilda Rogers.      

    • Anonymous

      We need to get you on more shows.  Period.

      • Anonymous

        Do you have a blog or twitter address? You and Qalil have a lot in common.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/KU6P4XPUIDTGSV52Z3QFCXNFPU Claudia

    Even though LiLWayne lyrics are beyond listening to, I truly believe he makes lyrics to whatever comes to his mind. And although he doesnt find that his lyrics are offensive to women and links out violence to the ears of our youth. I believe that for those who feels good to listen to it let them llisten. But the problem is about LilWaynes music is that its heard by the ears of our youth which has poured a degree of rapes, domestic violence and crimes in our streets. I understand this is just ways of making money and the songs sews no purpose of heart meaning to him but to others it is offensive and degrading among the black race.

  • Honee

    (I clearly admit to respecting his lyrical capabilities).  But one thing I
    can’t support is this kind of irresponsible music without realizing the
    implications that it has on our young children, and how their lives are
    destroyed before they even have a chance to make decisions for
    themselves.

    -coSign…

    PS.. Lil wayne was never a “young, powerless, poverty-stricken victim”….  he has been in the game for a very long time…  with his mother by his side… who made him promise finish school and not get any tattoo untile he was able to make his own decisions…. he is smart talented and intelligent…. 

    It is a shame that he has not used his gift for the upliftment of his nation but instead chooses the $$$ to the denigration of his people…

  • http://www.facebook.com/markscrain Mark Crain

    I appreciated Dr. Boyce’s commentary. It is absurd how concentrated we’ve allowed this stuff to become in commercial music and how much control we’ve lost over community media. As to his point toward the end, I would just note that a large portion of Arabs are actually Christian and don’t teach their children to memorize the Quran. It’s a Muslim practice, and a person who has memorized it is known as a hafiz. We should really decide what instructive book for life our Black community will learn by heart, because right now it’s an audiobook of destructive stories.

  • Rap Doesn’t Raise My Kids!

    Dr. Boyce,

    I generally feel you are on point with this.  But this is another case where our elders are off base.  Lil Wayne is an artist.  One artist.  He is not in the business of raising our children.  I could care less what he writes, raps, or records.  We are responsible for the children we bring into this world, and should act accordingly.  Hip hop is as rich and diverse and global as it ever has been.  But the masses, especially our elders, tend to hyper-focus on what is provided through the mainstream media.  This is the tragedy.  We place an inordinate amount of time bashing the creativity of a handful of artists while ignoring the art of others that have more positive messages.  As a former teacher, this reminds me of how the ‘bad’ kids always get the teacher’s attention while the ‘good’ kids are forced to deal with the scraps of time and attention that is left. 

    • Kid Truth

       “Lil Wayne is an artist. One artist. He is not in the business of raising our children. I could care less what he writes, raps, or records. We are responsible for the children we bring into this world, and should act accordingly.”

      —————–

      PREACH!

      _____________________________

      “Hip hop is as rich and diverse and global as it ever has been. But the masses, especially our elders, tend to hyper-focus on what is provided through the mainstream media. This is the tragedy. We place an inordinate amount of time bashing the creativity of a handful of artists while ignoring the art of others that have more positive messages.”

      —————

      *stands up*
      *applauds*

    • http://twitter.com/deedeerussell Dee Dee Russell

      Naw. 70% of our kids have no daddy at home momma at work OF COURSE the media is raising our kids WE watch more tv than any race in the USA!

  • Kturner123

    I have a major with his promotions of gang life.  He is a million that is not banging, but is trying to ‘market/sale’ gang life to our youth.  he’s a clown. I’m done

  • Kid Truth

    *lights Newport*
     
    Ok, not to be a d*ck but I agree with Hqk. Where were all you old heads when NWA hit the scene? Or 2 Live Crew??? Should of been boycotting THEN, before things became this way.

    I’m NOT defending Wayne as I agree his music is sh*tty and isn’t somethin kids should be listenin to but he is NOT the root of the problem. I’m just tired of the older folks talkin down on my generation (I’m 22) when they are partly responsible for the state we’re currently in.

    Wayne is where he is because this is what the youth wanna hear. To me, it’s trash tho. I try to get my peers to listen to a Nas or a Joe Budden, they listen to a song or two, say its cool, then go right back to their Wayne or Waka Flocka. At the end of the day, people listen to what they like.

    Remember, popular music is a reflection of society, not vice-versa. I can guarantee gettin rid of Wayne IS NOT gonna fix the ills of the black community.

    Why not attack REAL problems like the inequal distribution of wealth in this country? I’m 1,000,000% sure that, THAT is a root of more issues in this society (black community especially) than Lil f*cking Wayne

    Nice try tho…

  • Anonymous

    um …. it’s about time you have finally seen some LIGHT …..
    although – the ACTION has already been started to stop networks and stations like BET, CENTRIC and TV ONE to start giving their audiences what they NEED and not what they think they want.

    We are already DEMANDING that these networks give us:
    1.) An EDUCATIONAL CHANNEL dealing with black history in America and Abroad.
    2.) A NEW NETWORK dealing with Blacks and Non Whites in America.
    Since blacks are portrayed the way main stream media chooses to.

    Blacks don’t need the devil worshiping artists to lead our children, future and youth down a road of destruction.

  • Anonymous

    um …. it’s about time you have finally seen some LIGHT …..
    although – the ACTION has already been started to stop networks and stations like BET, CENTRIC and TV ONE to start giving their audiences what they NEED and not what they think they want.

    We are already DEMANDING that these networks give us:
    1.) An EDUCATIONAL CHANNEL dealing with black history in America and Abroad.
    2.) A NEW NETWORK dealing with Blacks and Non Whites in America.
    Since blacks are portrayed the way main stream media chooses to.

    Blacks don’t need the devil worshiping artists to lead our children, future and youth down a road of destruction.

  • 4Truth

    Lil Wayne is angry and crazy.  It is quite a shame that he had such a platform on the BET Awards.  It is sad to see such messed up black males hiding behind the music industry.  He has some real issues and has no business trying to make money off garbage in the diguise of music.  People need to teach there kids that losers will use your mind and your money to further their garbage lifestyles. Lil Wayne obviously hate women and children and therefore is unfit for society, let alone making music and getting praised for it. 

  • Teryns1977

    I enjoy most hip hop, but I don’t enjoy the violence and degradation of women in some of the songs. However, the problems that we face in our communiites is from lack of parenting. Where is the parental responsibility? Jesse and Al need to march about that!  I grew up listening to gangsta rap and never once felt compelled to “bust a cap” or “slap a bi#$h! I have “real” parents that taught me morals and values. They didn’t excuse poor behavior in school or anywhere else. Stop blaming music and the “white man” for inadequacies in our communities. We need to look at ourselves. Why are there so many black men absent from the homes? Why don’t our young women exercise discretion and stop gapping their legs to any and every guy that pays them a little attention. Too many unwed mothers with more than one “baby daddy”. We cannot blame this on Lil Wayne and any other rapper for that matter.

  • Thomas Holmes

    Yesterday I preached a sermon on the topic “What does it look like?” Coming from Matthew 6:19-23 I dealt with how our value systems have changed and how many of our young people embrace the iconic fast money getting hip hop stars like Lil Wayne to shape their worldview.  I suggested that there is a moral deficit that has ruptured the vision of what it means to be an African American.

     I suggested that many young urban youth lack positive role models in their communities, a hunger for education (which is a form of light) live in a society that has advanced economically while the moral and emotional conditions of their environments have deteriorated.  Where their hearts are their their treasure will be also. I quoted Bakari Kitwana former editor of the Source Magazine and author “Young
    Blacks and the Crisis in American Culture: The Hip Hop Generation,” who spoke as a member of the hip hop generation of the 90’s:   

     
    “For our parent’s generation, the
    political ideals of civil rights and Black power are central to their
    worldview. Our parent’s generation placed family, spirituality, social
    responsibility, and Black pride at the center of their identity as Black
    Americans.  They, like their parents
    before them, looked to their elders for values and identity. The core set of
    values shared by a large segment of the hip hop generation—Black America’s
    generation X—stands in contrast to our parent’s worldview. For the most part,
    we have turned to ourselves, our peers, global images and products, and the new
    realities we face for guidance. In the process, the values and attitudes
    described above anchor our worldview.  

    Without a doubt our value systems have changed.

    As a minister, a scholar, a DJ and mentor of young men, I make a conscious decision not to play or support popular music that sends the wrong message.  It is not limited to hip hop, but derogatory, foul language and sexually explicit lyrics can be found in many other genres.  Many of us have been conformed to this world and the light that informs our appetites, heightens our desires and draws us away from our “center,” is one that is full of darkness. Lil Wayne even thanked God for his reward last night.  The question is what God is he serving? More importantly what gods are we serving?

    • Honee

      Thomas Holmes, very well said…  may the light in you that brought forth this message continue to shine…I salute youNamaste

  • Creative Brother

    Dead people support dead music:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5fWE7sAj5Y

  • http://www.facebook.com/twinnbep Twinnzel Washington

    Now you

  • twinnzel

    Now you gotta ask yourself “Why do I feel that Lil Wayne is so powerful that I need to pick him out of the many rappers in the world?”. Is it Lil Wayne’s fault that people pick him as a leader? In his documentary & his VH1 special, he says he doesn’t want to be the role model but that the parents need to play that role. They have to choice and option to keep their kids from listening. Also, in that song from the Lil Wayne quote you used, features Gucci Mane, a person who has been to jail more than 5 times in 3 years (from murder to parole violation to domestic violence) he talks about the same gang affiliation and even mentions it in the same song. Why not single out Gucci Mane? Is it because you think so low of black people that you only feel the need to call them out once they or popular. I have seen the post on the BET awards (that have been going on for 11 years) why wait until the show airs to pick at it? Just a question.

    You’re pointing fingers at a man who is using the right of free speech, while you use yours to pick at him. Lets not throw stones at the leader instead why not create an alternative? Let me state my direct point incase no one understands…. Lil Wayne is not the enemy. 10 years ago his rap (20 years ago NWA & Ice Cube) had the same content. If it takes for him to be the #1 rapper for us to realize whats around us, then we need to take a look at ourselves.

  • Balance Seeker

    As i read your commentary, my heart felt heavy… Because I realized that I was one of those women that you were talking about.   I too love hip-hop  I am a 37yr old woman who grew up in during the birth of it… And I while I can appreciate a clean cut gentleman…i also have a weakness for those who look like lil Wayne.  I listen to his music and conveniently do my best to overlook when I hear lil Wayne say something reckless in one of his songs…   But today as i read this article…..It became completely clear to me that I would have to let him go….(not purchase any more or his music, not go to the concert here in CT that he has coming up next month and not put his pictures up as my screen saver on my  PC.   Because more important than ANYTHING….i realize that I am sending the wrong message to my 17yr old son…who is well aware of my love for young weezy…. and has questioned me and pretty much …in so many words called me a hypocrite because of my preaching on demanding in our household that our black males need to respect and protect their black women and love and be kind to us….. And not take our dedication and loyalty to them for granted or see it as a weakness and take advantage of it.  As of today…I too am ditching Lil Wayne….not only because he continues to display huge amounts of disrespect and disregards for  Black Women….  But most importantly to show my son that there are consequences for horrible actions..and that it is not okay for the black male to continue to turn his back on us black women and call us horrible names and have no regard for out love, feeling and lives or loyalty.   And that if you continue to mistreat us we will eventually have no choice but to show ourselves the deserved love and walk away….. because it wont be tolerated.
    I will make a point to talk to my son and his friends about why….even the edited versions of Lil Wayne’s music  is no longer welcome in my home or car radio….and why i am throwing out his poster that is on the wall of our media room.    And then i will redirect them with allowing them to hear me solely listen to only those who celebrate and send out loving messages to women who look like me…
    Thank you for this message today… and continue to spread awareness… it is not in vain.

    peace and love!

    CT 30’s the 20 something yr old mom

    • Honee

      I applaud YOU….  Each One Teach One…. and this is where it starts… ^5

    • Anonymous

      You speak for a lot of us, who, naturally, are drawn to the music for its rhythm and funky beats (I don’t usually listen to the words).  I bought Lil Kim’s Hardcore, decades ago, hoping it wasn’t what the title said, and had to get rid of it, it was so denigrating. 

    • MLiza

      I commend you for having the courage to admit you were wrong.  It is so responsible of you to take this message to heart.  It means much to our youth in our community when we demand respect from our artists — no matter how enthralling the beat and the melody:  if the message is wrong — it needs to be shut out.  Thank you again for standing up for that which is right for your own family and your children’s friends.  It means much to the Black community in general as well.

  • Balance Seeker

    As i read your commentary, my heart felt heavy… Because I realized that I was one of those women that you were talking about.   I too love hip-hop  I am a 37yr old woman who grew up in during the birth of it… And I while I can appreciate a clean cut gentleman…i also have a weakness for those who look like lil Wayne.  I listen to his music and conveniently do my best to overlook when I hear lil Wayne say something reckless in one of his songs…   But today as i read this article…..It became completely clear to me that I would have to let him go….(not purchase any more or his music, not go to the concert here in CT that he has coming up next month and not put his pictures up as my screen saver on my  PC.   Because more important than ANYTHING….i realize that I am sending the wrong message to my 17yr old son…who is well aware of my love for young weezy…. and has questioned me and pretty much …in so many words called me a hypocrite because of my preaching on demanding in our household that our black males need to respect and protect their black women and love and be kind to us….. And not take our dedication and loyalty to them for granted or see it as a weakness and take advantage of it.  As of today…I too am ditching Lil Wayne….not only because he continues to display huge amounts of disrespect and disregards for  Black Women….  But most importantly to show my son that there are consequences for horrible actions..and that it is not okay for the black male to continue to turn his back on us black women and call us horrible names and have no regard for out love, feeling and lives or loyalty.   And that if you continue to mistreat us we will eventually have no choice but to show ourselves the deserved love and walk away….. because it wont be tolerated.
    I will make a point to talk to my son and his friends about why….even the edited versions of Lil Wayne’s music  is no longer welcome in my home or car radio….and why i am throwing out his poster that is on the wall of our media room.    And then i will redirect them with allowing them to hear me solely listen to only those who celebrate and send out loving messages to women who look like me…
    Thank you for this message today… and continue to spread awareness… it is not in vain.

    peace and love!

    CT 30’s the 20 something yr old mom

  • Mac

    Ridiculous. Raise your own kids dont let music raise them. Lil Wayne is rhyming freestyle and do you really  think that some one will hear these lyrics and want to act them out in real life? It’s entertainment… albeit not very good entertainment but this is too much. who else you boycotting? 

    • AprilMayJune

      that’s part of the problem, yes of course parents should be raising their kids!  But if the parents are soaking in weezy’s lyrics and letting their kids do the same…… it’s a problem.

      and alot of times weezy is not freestyling. Those rhymes are thought out and rehearsed. As of lately, his freestyle raps have been wack and nonsensical probably cuz of  all the drugs he uses.

  • Lynn

    Dr. Boyce,   I have to admit that, as I considered my comments on this thread about no one speaking up or boycotting people like Lil Wayne until now because they only care about the life outcomes of black men, I felt guilty.  I feel guilty for specifically impugning your motives; I know you have daughters, and I’m sure you love and care about them a lot, and don’t want them to reap the fruits of the kind of lyrics you quoted.  So, I apologize for impugning your motives. I’m grateful that you have the courage to speak out.   At the same time, I am still nonetheless concerned about the entire paragraph you devote to the influence of women.  You write that “There is also an interesting contradiction that female support of Lil Wayne sends to young men.”  I’m almost 40, so I don’t know what young women these days are listening to, nor do I know how many profess to love Lil Wayne.  So, it would be more helpful to me if you provided concrete facts to support the assertion that “black women across America hold the keys to Lil Wayne’s acceptance in the psyches of black men.”  I don’t get it: how did black women become the ones holding the keys?  Until you can explain why you say this, and support it with facts, that entire paragraph comes across to me as you simply trying throw blame on black women for what Lil Wayne and young black men choose to do.  I think that’s wrong, I think it’s a cop out, and I think it’s unfair.  I think it also totally ignores the history of outrage that many black women expressed about misogynistic rap music.  You bypass all the women who have rejected this music, as well as spoken out against it, only to single out some vague monolithic group of young black women who have become so powerful to the psyche of black men that they now apparently “hold the keys.”  Really?    You would do better, I think, to target the people like those commenters who call you an “Uncle Tom” or a “sellout” or a “crab in a barrel” for daring to challenge another black man and threaten his success.  The people who are saying this, be they men or women, are far more responsible for Lil Wayne’s acceptance in the black community than are the hapless young women who have been as equally influenced by this music as have been young black men.  In trying to make these young women responsible for the music that victimizes them, you are, in my opinion, victimizing them a second time (while trying to show black men that you are not a total sellout to their cause just because you’re criticizing Lil Wayne). Your approach, and the approach of people like KB on this thread reminds me of how white people throw some of the blame off of themselves for slavery by reminding us that Africans sold slaves too.  Yes, they did, but really now, who has the most responsibility?

  • Lynn

    Dr. Boyce,   I have to admit that, as I considered my comments on this thread about no one speaking up or boycotting people like Lil Wayne until now because they only care about the life outcomes of black men, I felt guilty.  I feel guilty for specifically impugning your motives; I know you have daughters, and I’m sure you love and care about them a lot, and don’t want them to reap the fruits of the kind of lyrics you quoted.  So, I apologize for impugning your motives. I’m grateful that you have the courage to speak out.At the same time, I am still nonetheless concerned about the entire paragraph you devote to the influence of women.  You write that “There is also an interesting contradiction that female support of Lil Wayne sends to young men.”  I’m almost 40, so I don’t know what young women these days are listening to, nor do I know how many profess to love Lil Wayne.  So, it would be more helpful to me if you provided concrete facts to support the assertion that “black women across America hold the keys to Lil Wayne’s acceptance in the psyches of black men.”  I don’t get it: how did black women become the ones holding the keys?  Until you can explain why you say this, and support it with facts, that entire paragraph comes across to me as you simply trying throw blame on black women for what Lil Wayne and young black men choose to do.  I think that’s wrong, I think it’s a cop out, and I think it’s unfair.  I think it also totally ignores the history of outrage that many black women expressed about misogynistic rap music.  You bypass all the women who have rejected this music, as well as spoken out against it, only to single out some vague monolithic group of young black women who have become so powerful to the psyche of black men that they now apparently “hold the keys.”  Really?You would do better, I think, to target the people like those commenters who call you an “Uncle Tom” or a “sellout” or a “crab in a barrel” for daring to challenge another black man and threaten his success.  The people who are saying this, be they men or women, are far more responsible for Lil Wayne’s acceptance in the black community than are the hapless young women who have been as equally influenced by this music as have been young black men.  In trying to make these young women responsible for the music that victimizes them, you are, in my opinion, victimizing them a second time (while trying to show black men that you are not a total sellout to their cause just because you’re criticizing Lil Wayne). Your approach, and the approach of people like KB on this thread reminds me of how white people throw some of the blame off of themselves for slavery by reminding us that Africans sold slaves too.  Yes, they did, but really now, who has the most responsibility?

    • Kid Truth

       “I’m almost 40, so I don’t know what young women these days are listening to, nor do I know how many profess to love Lil Wayne.”
       
      ————-
       
      That explains everything. I’m 22 and damn near every female I know is an avid Wayne listener.
       
      Also, it’s a well known fact that females make up a very large percentage of the music consumer demographic. Lil Wayne is a platinum selling artist. Put 2+2 together and I’m sure you’ll see who is the biggest culprit behind Wayne’s popularity. So I’m not sure what “facts” you’re lookin for…
       
      IMHO, you sound a lil bitter. Every post I read from you, you’re sh*ttin on black dudes, while tryin to paint black females as “victims.” Why???

      • Honee

        Agree with everything except your last paragraph…  I don’t know the blogger to whom you are responding…  but my comment was going to be similar to your post and I am a 40ish female…

        Namaste

  • Mspepis

    Thank you Dr. Watkins about speaking out about that rapper, though he’s not the only one.  I refuse to say his name because he disgust me.  It’s all about the dollar.  They all have been created to continue the destruction of the black race.  What sickens me so  is that most don’t care.  As a Blackwoman who’s concerned about the craziness in the world today, and seeing what our ancestors have faught so hard for, we have gone backwards, past where we started, at least we had self pride and some committement to ou.  I love those who treat me like I treat them but we have lost many generations to that ignorant, degrading, immoral, so called music that promotes violence and sex. What good about that!! You said everything I would say but better!   When I hear those lyrics blasting out the cars, I turn my head in disgust..then see so many blackmen and now woman with their dam- pants down thier ass & so occupied with twisting their hair. I am from Brooklyn, ny, & so I understand it has its significance in our history but with so many wearing them now, it’s  not even a fashion statement, it’s slack. Then we wonder why so many other races talk so ugly about us..not that they are angels  but we are extreme and were already trained by the wicked so called slave master to hate ourselves. To add insult to injury, blackwoman with thier boobs pushed up out thier blouse..no shame or self respect, O, its sexy..now little girls are doing it!  I am 49 and I never grew up like what I see today.  When I first heard that gangster rap and saw how much it influences, I knew our children were doomed.  Those lyrics cause nothing but violence, & mayhem, as far as I am concerned, it’s the national athem for the gang culture & is used to continue self annihilation..and what have we done to protect the children..nothing! while so many innocent people, children are being killed, forced into that wicked, ignorant culture. The dam- parents listen to it!   As far as wanting a thug..I hate them. Me & some intelligent blackwoman talk about the issue with blackmen, either in jail, thug, down low, married, & the ones we do meet..it’s all about sex.  The thought of meeting an intelligent, well groomed blackman for dating seems very bleak.  We committed blackwoman can stop wondering why, everywhere I turn, they have a whitewoman or woman of another race, while at the same talking negative about the blackwoman. Another form of genocide against our race. I know many good blackmen are beat down but just as many good blackwoman are just as beat down..WE are invisible!! Believe me, I am disgusted w/the ignorant blackwoman too ..they treat me nasty!   I can write my own book,  now same sex. woman want to be a man, visa versa…God help our children because as a race, we have done nothing to save them.  We have more fatherless boys and girls than any other race on this planet.  But I see that a blackman can take care of their mix kids. The drop out rate, babies having babies, STDS, gang banging, tatoos, jail, drugs, blackmen don’t want blackwoman, rather talk down & beat down..blackwoman dragging good blackment to court to bleed them dry..my father is 79..he went through the same thing..but we were with him..hello!!..I guest we still have time..those of you who care..please mentor..put action behind your words.time is running out!! everyone else teaching thier children..stand up for what’s right!

  • Mspepis

    Thank you Dr. Watkins about speaking out about that rapper, though he’s not the only one.  I refuse to say his name because he disgust me.  It’s all about the dollar.  They all have been created to continue the destruction of the black race.  What sickens me so  is that most don’t care.  As a Blackwoman who’s concerned about the craziness in the world today, and seeing what our ancestors have faught so hard for, we have gone backwards, past where we started, at least we had self pride and some committement to ou.  I love those who treat me like I treat them but we have lost many generations to that ignorant, degrading, immoral, so called music that promotes violence and sex. What good about that!! You said everything I would say but better!   When I hear those lyrics blasting out the cars, I turn my head in disgust..then see so many blackmen and now woman with their dam- pants down thier ass & so occupied with twisting their hair. I am from Brooklyn, ny, & so I understand it has its significance in our history but with so many wearing them now, it’s  not even a fashion statement, it’s slack. Then we wonder why so many other races talk so ugly about us..not that they are angels  but we are extreme and were already trained by the wicked so called slave master to hate ourselves. To add insult to injury, blackwoman with thier boobs pushed up out thier blouse..no shame or self respect, O, its sexy..now little girls are doing it!  I am 49 and I never grew up like what I see today.  When I first heard that gangster rap and saw how much it influences, I knew our children were doomed.  Those lyrics cause nothing but violence, & mayhem, as far as I am concerned, it’s the national athem for the gang culture & is used to continue self annihilation..and what have we done to protect the children..nothing! while so many innocent people, children are being killed, forced into that wicked, ignorant culture. The dam- parents listen to it!   As far as wanting a thug..I hate them. Me & some intelligent blackwoman talk about the issue with blackmen, either in jail, thug, down low, married, & the ones we do meet..it’s all about sex.  The thought of meeting an intelligent, well groomed blackman for dating seems very bleak.  We committed blackwoman can stop wondering why, everywhere I turn, they have a whitewoman or woman of another race, while at the same talking negative about the blackwoman. Another form of genocide against our race. I know many good blackmen are beat down but just as many good blackwoman are just as beat down..WE are invisible!! Believe me, I am disgusted w/the ignorant blackwoman too ..they treat me nasty!   I can write my own book,  now same sex. woman want to be a man, visa versa…God help our children because as a race, we have done nothing to save them.  We have more fatherless boys and girls than any other race on this planet.  But I see that a blackman can take care of their mix kids. The drop out rate, babies having babies, STDS, gang banging, tatoos, jail, drugs, blackmen don’t want blackwoman, rather talk down & beat down..blackwoman dragging good blackment to court to bleed them dry..my father is 79..he went through the same thing..but we were with him..hello!!..I guest we still have time..those of you who care..please mentor..put action behind your words.time is running out!! everyone else teaching thier children..stand up for what’s right!

  • Albert Taylor

    I don’t allow my children to listen to or buy Lil Wayne music and I have talked to and educated them about what I feel about those hip hop artist who are ignorant or just don’t care what they are saying to their own brothers and sisters.  I have long been aware of what the music industry is doing with our black artist, always they want them to dumb their music down and feed us a perpetual stream of mish mash that effectively tells our children that they are all the things that white society has said we were all the time.. These artist should be educating with their music and uplifting our black culture rather than making it worse.  Never ever had A LIL WAYNE cd in this house cause I hate Ignorance.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Cara-Ray/100001607930748 Cara Ray

    It all started with the rap group N.W.A…blame them!!

  • Dahotness503

    If u don’t like the music…don’t listen. It is not for the rappers to raise your kids. Take responsiblity for your kids actions. I believe in common sense…if you let a song influence you, something is seriously wrong. However, I do agree this rap music could be a little more positive but some right what they feel at the moment….It doesn’t mean they do what they say in their songs.

  • Benjy54

    Thanks for waking up Dr.Boyce, not all of rap is crap BUT unfortunately young lost men such as Lil Wayne seem to be at the for front of the game and have taken gangsta rap to a whole new level of ignorance.  

  • AprilMayJune

    I had been a fan a wanye’s for so long, and like Dr. Boyce, recognize his abilities; which makes it so hard to listen to his music. I thought that maybe going to jail would have given weezy a chance to realize some of the things mentioned in this article- But he came out dumber than he went in. I hope lil Wayne gets a chance to read this essay.

  • Anonymous

    @6683305e9582af6ede06784d4d9f0510:disqus   You are 100% correct this cancer the has invaded our community should have been removed along time ago. It is not only Mr.Carter it is the lot of them. They have maid millions perpetrating this fraud on children , and it has gotten to the point that it is beyond criminal. Dr. Watson said in his article said Charles Manson never committed any
    of the murders he is imprisoned but he sanctioned them. Is there any difference in what these so called artist have done to countless numbers of youths. There image is the majority image the world see as AA. This madness needs to stop. This type of free speech isn’t free it has caused lots of grieving Mothers and Fathers , Grandparents ,friends and family’s. 

  • Deloris

    I think Lil Wayne is a miseducated negro who participates in the genocide of the African American family.  His music. if you can call it that. has no place in the annals of music by and for Black people.

    Deloris 

  • djsmith

    Lil W has always been a women hatter

  • E Brown

    I understand the point of this post and agree that we should eliminate the trash. The only issue with that is that people must replace those negative things with 2 things that give the opposite impression. The people who control the media have totally different agendas than the ones that we have for our children, maybe it is time that we start supporting the agendas that align with what we want in our communities.

  • mytruth1

    I know this is late but I had to get in on the conversation.. You know I will be 40 in a couple of mos. and I came up in the Too Short, Ice-T, NWA, Public Enemy, Ghetto Boys, e,t,c. era… Nothing has changed in rap music. Everything has changed in R&B… It’s funny how R&B is basically about begging for sex or male bashing but rappers always get talked about. I guess because of the pants sagging.. (Which is repulsive) However, why do we have to always take the responsibility away from these kids? They are driving what is being played and what is bought. Everybody talks like these kids don’t know what they are listening to.. I always say, I listened to rap music and didn’t want to go out and kill anyone or think going to jail made me tough, or wanted to call every girl a bitch, or really wanted to hear about some girl making a song about how much money she can get from a guy or what he needed to have to get her. As long as there is money involved and no morals this music will continue to prosper and be relevant. People are buying this music and supporting these artists…  At some point we have to stop pointing the finger at the artists because while Mr. Watkins talks about the affect is has on our youth, a tthe same time they have to be held responsible. Since when does a rapper or any entertainer determine how you think? See, smart kids can differentiate or listen to music but not take it to the extreme of mocking these rappers or singers every time they move. They drive these fancy cars which may or may not be their’s but who doesn’t admire a nice car? It could be driven by a older white man… Does it matter? You still want it… But we don’t care how the white man got it only how the rapper got it and what he does.. These other crooks in corporate America are worse than the rappers but nobody says anything about them. And how is it that these young kids get to listen to this music anyway?  Even on local stations the R&B music is only talking about sex… Is that okay? While I definitely don’t agree with a lot of the lyrics, I just think people are missing the point of how do our young children get these lyrics in their ears anyway? I wouldn’t let my kids listen to any of this crap WHILE I KNEW ABOUT IT… That’s the issue. And, I would hope they wouldn’t listen to it around other kids who’s parents may not think its a big deal… But you can’t raise someone else’s kids for them. I would just hope and pray that they have the ability like I did to understand it was just music. I saw Mr. Watkins post some Lil Wayne lyrics that should put him in jail but what little kid hears that stuff? It’s not on the radio? It’s on the internet, ipods, or you can download it but he’s analyzing every word and disecting it lyric by lyric. Bottom line is if you really analyze (which doesn’t happen as a kid) all rappers and R&B lyrics then no one would be on radio. So if there are outlets for this music to get to kids regardless of what we think what are we going to do to make them understand these lyrics aren’t cool, seeing some kids underwear is not cool, going to jail is not cool, getting shot is not cool, male bashing and degrading young black men isn’t cool by women…  Since we can’t stop the money being given to this behavior, then we need to start in the home. And that’s it…..

  • Digital_bedouin

    Dr Boyce article on lil Wayne and bet being the new kkk is so on point! 15 years of listening to the same garbage mantra in rap music all condoning the most vile crap with pride, im sick of it, check out this artist I came across, real hiphop real substance!!
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/T-Da-TruFE/270255225211
    http://www.reverbnation.com/tdatrufe

  • dumbasses

    Lil Wayne is garbage. There should be no fucking debate about it and this ‘Dr.’ shouldn’t haven’t posted this. Modern rap in GENERAL is degrading and useless. These people make money off of all of YOUR stupidity. Not my stupidity, YOUR stupidity. I don’t listen to this shit I listen to music that takes thought and talent, which contains a lot more though provoking and meaningful subjects then MONEY, BITCHES, and CARS. You should all be ashamed of yourselves.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alec-Sevins/100001026837377 Alec Sevins

      Well put. That has long been evident to decent people, but the world is full of degenerates who are too into it to hold up a mirror to their own depravity.

      Call them on their taste and they shoot back the same lies as pit bull owners who claim they own the animals because they’re friendly. It’s too incongruous to make sense. Crummy people listen to crummy music, with the exception of rebellious teenage stages.

  • Boydbrbr239

    WHY?. BLACK WOMEN ARE SUFFERING MORE THAN AN WOMEN ON THE FACE OF THE EARTH, NO MY CHILD WE MUST HIT YOU HARD IN YOUR POCKET.

    TRY A POSITIVE SONG TOWARD BLACK WOMEN

    THANKS.
    CPT. B.B.

  • Nena

    I, personally, have an affinity for hyper-violence, in my music and television. I, however, am not a violent person. I can draw the line between entertainment and reality, but I had help during my upbringing to make that distinction. When a child is in their most impressionable years and this is all they hear and see, it is up to the parent to interrupt the download and show the youth the ways of the world. It is when this download of misinformation goes uninterrupted that misanthropes are molded.

    If lil’ wayne had a positive message, no one would take him seriously. and if they did, he’d be dead. I don’t blame him for not becoming a martyr, thats not a role that can be forced on anyone. Although, his desire for riches has caused a general “dumbing down” in his tracks. He had enough of a fortune to live comfortably long ago, there is no reason to still be playing the media’s game. He has the world listening, now would be the time to use the power and influence he’s accumulated. Unfortunately, this is what he’s chosen to do with it.

    I would like to use as an example, Lupe Fiasco. If he’d’ve played ball with record execs he’d be a phenom all over the radio and mtv/bet. He however refused to surrender his integrity or positive message. Thusly, his song ‘Beamin’ was seldom played on the radio and his videos were all but stricken from tv. Due to his following of intelligent, strong supporters he is still successful and spreading his message. He has created “A brand that the fans trust”  Its just unfortunate that people look down on him and call him ‘wack’ because he isn’t rapping about gangsta shit.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alec-Sevins/100001026837377 Alec Sevins

      You should enlighten readers as to WHY you crave that hyper violence. Things are rarely that abstract. Imagine a world where everyone was a thug-worshipper.

      Based on a number of personal experiences (mainly asking belligerent punks to turn down their so-called music), I don’t buy the claim that gangsta rap fans are decent people. It just doesn’t fit the evidence.

      They should all be forced to visit parts of Africa and the Middle East for a real taste of their attitude when it’s not constrained by moral people.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alec-Sevins/100001026837377 Alec Sevins

    One of the worst things about hip hop and gangsta rap is the boom-car morons who force the low-frequency aspects on innocent bystanders who need to sleep at night and work at honest jobs instead of lounging around, glorifying criminal behavior.

    The whole culture of that “music” is parasitic and useless. I don’t buy into the claim that people (like Nena here) can passively listen to it. Something’s going on in their mind that they aren’t revealing. Intrinsically decent people don’t need that input. Same goes for thrash metal. And the bling-bling they crave only exists because of people who are NOT like them. Society would crash in a matter of weeks if thugs were solely in charge. You’d soon see the real meaning of their lousy, negative attitudes and lack of any real productivity.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alec-Sevins/100001026837377 Alec Sevins

    There is far too much tolerance of thug-life culture in America. Too many people are pretending it’s just another harmless personal statement, rather than something underlain with criminal mayhem. There are many people living right on the edge of civility and crossing the line too often. Let’s call them what they really are and stop all glorification of them.

  • Anonymous

    Good article, but you have two mixed messages. One is that it’s the duty of the community to speak with their dollars and say “this isn’t okay.” That is absolutely true.
    The other message is the tired conspiracy theory that this is a plot by white corporate America to poison black minds. Sorry, but if this was the case, that same corprorate America was pushing plenty of stuff on their own kids: anti-establishment rebellion in the 80s (Punk), satanism and hard drug use in the 90s (Metal and Grunge).Bottom line: it’s about making money and giving the customer what they are likely to spend money on.Today, the same messages of ignorance, thug fashion, violence and misogyny (Hip Hop) that are sent to black kids go to white ears. The biggest market for rap is white teens simply by numbers. Perhaps that’s why it’s so bottom-of-the-barrel, they are selling “ghetto-tourism” to suburban kids and the more shocking the imagery, the better it sells. 

    • Jordan Williams1984

      i think his point about white corporate America was less about that they are conspiring to poison black minds, but that in their pursuit of money, they are in fact poisoning black minds (as well as minds of other “colors” as well!). not that they are conspiring to do this, but that it is a byproduct of their business strategy… one they are ignoring to the peril of our society i believe.

      • Anonymous

        I agree on second reading, but I still feel he strays quite close to victim language on a topic which should have nothing to do with that. It is still a gutsy stance in a climate that labels any artistic criticism “hating.”
        The biggest problem with hip hop is that it has become more of an industry than an artform.
        It’s ironic, isn’t it, that often times the “realest” rappers — those who come from nothing, and become wealthy working their business, even their image, as they would the “street enterprises” they did when they were small-time — are the closest thing to the traditional definition of an artistic sellout — all about getting paid by any means, above all else.

  • Jordan Williams1984

    It seems more and more people are beginning to notice this sort of thing and talking about it. I am thankful for that. If we really belive this, we also need to stop listening to it in our own private time. We also need to stop dancing to it at the clubs. It seems like in that venue, all our common sense and sense of decency go out the window. How many women would sue their male employers or coworkers for speaking like this, but then go dance to it?
    But the biggest thing is with our children. We have to be the grown-ups and tell them no to the things they want that are not good for them. We have to be parents to them and not try to be their best friend, or worse, have a hands-off approach to parenting. Do we give them money or an allowance? What are they buying with it? CDs? iTune downloads? Its our job as parents to make sure that we are doing our best to ensure that such poison is not on constant drip into their minds and hearts.

  • Stephenwilson2003

    These lyrics are damaging. I see my nephews reciting those words on facebook. Its mind control in a bad way

  • http://www.facebook.com/djrussh Rus Tha Docta Cordova

    This is right on point except where it singles out African American’s, this irresponsible artist and others like him are affecting many cultures, including young white teens! Great writing and true points tho, thank you.

  • http://twitter.com/pastorofplur pastorofplur

    How does that change or address the problem of a society so bereft of parents, teachers, & role models that children learn everything they do/think/say from strangers’ voices over the radio?

    And the problem of children growing into adults who are still so mired in poverty/victim/unloved/rejected conditions that that they feel inhuman…like monsters. What creates that aberration, and what are we doing about it?

  • MLiza

    Dr. Boyce Watkins, I commend you!  Its high time someone of your caliber helped the masses of African-American people realize their power over some of the most offensive and evil messages that some of our artists are spewing out of their minds and mouths to the degradation of our entire society and race — let alone the youth.  However, while your ire and intent have great merit, there is little effective in your final analysis since you do not go far enough to outline an appropriate plan of action that can make our rejections known to the world effectively.  It is not just that his words on murdering may affect young people’s mentality, but that the concepts are totally inappropriate for any society and should be banned.  What evil these words promote is a devaluing ot life in general.  No one needs any additional motivation to push anyone further over the edge than he ordinarily would be in the causation of taking another person’s life — which we see so much of these days.  Artists can be edgy without going over the top.  There has to be a limit.

    The shame and disgust I feel about these gansta rappers and most uncouth artists like him is evident in that I am happy when they are put at the end of the BET Awards program so I can then turn off the TV and not miss those artists that I can appreciate and enjoy.  It amazes me that BET even has the nerve to include them at all — it is such a devaluation of their entire projectory.  It feels to me that they are seemingly forced to do it for some monetary reason; and the shame that the CEO goes through to laud and include them is evident so much so that one can almost see her cringing.  We all know it’s about the “Benjamins.”  There have been attrempts to place them in their own awards show — so people like us can elect to avoid watching it.  There is even an attempt to have a separate BET Honors program which excludes them.  Thank goodness!  Sometimes I wonder how Gospel artists can even share the same stage with that trash.

    My rant is not to degrade all hiphop.  There is some value to some of it across the span of time.  But anything that is positive is rarely promoted.  For instance many on this site lump all of the artists together.  Nas has been known to create many positive songs, according to young people and some I have heard myself.  So it is wrong not to give some their due.  Usually, for adults, they have a lot of difficulty in even identifying what these guys are saying in many instances.  However, young people can understand every word; and even the primary school children can repeat every word when they cannot even repeat their Times Tables.  That’s the disgusting reality.  But while we are confronting the rappers, we also need to counteract the women who dance lewdly and allow their images to be misused so horrendously in these videos.  The thrust of the message is that a REAL BOYCOTT and SPEAK OUT needs to be organized at the right sources.  Not just with BET, the commercial sponsors, as well as the Music Industry.

    Saying this is long overdue and about time we went after BET and offensive Black Music is a waste of time.  [Even though It is shameful that a boycott was done only individually and not done by the masses when the network was Black-owned and Uncut after midnight (to know what to criticize one has to have first-hand information and not hearsay), it is sad to say that BET has made an obvious attempt to clean-up its programming only since it changed hands into non-Black ownership.  We need to give a little credit where it is due.]  Yet we still need to definitive efforts to counteract these social and racial offenses whenever we can how ever we can in as effectively organized manner that we can.  So Dr. Boyce Watkins, I urge you to help us all put some power collectively behind your stance — if it is REAL.

  • Sarah V

    while I agree that the lyrics and messages in hip hop songs (and other musical genres) are sometimes very wrong, I don’t really get how you can blame it on the “White Owned Corperate America” that to me is baseless and sensless.  First of all I would say the majority of these rappers write about what the know and where they came from and what they themselves have seen on the streets, second when the music industry starts censoring what they are willing to publish, (which will never happen) that’s messing with our first amendment rights as Americans….Third the record labels that most of the hip hop artists or rappers are signed to are not even big (White) as you say corperate labels, but  smaller labels that they themselves own or a close colleague.  I mean no disrespect Dr. Watkins but perhaps you should check your facts before making statements that could be viewed as racist, in a public forum

  • Throwback Jay

    I’ll start by saying that I agree with Dr. Watkins, to a point! I’ll support his efforts 100%. While I agree that Wayne and many other entertainers, period (i.e., comedians, R&B artist, thespians etc.) contribute heavily to the demonization of the black masculinity and feminism, when the smoke clears, they’re only artists who are taking advantage of opportunities to express different angles of their art form on a platform provided by the enemy of Black life. Although I believe in holding them accountable, I know that shutting down Li’l Wayne today, only means that “Kill-A-Nation John” will take his place tomorrow using the same characterization, expressing the same self-loathing ideology only in a different package–because…he’ll be using the same platform provided by the same enemy of black life.  Nonetheless, I’m down with Dr. Watkins because he’s using his own platform to standup and fight the way he sees fit. Any real man has to respect that.  

  • http://twitter.com/katakwi jazzy best

    I blame the consumer more then then the producer. If consumer continues to buy crap then producer will produce it. It is all about $. Stop the flow of $ and trash will stop. 
     As for younger children the blame to me is on the parents. I have two children and I am involved in lives and while I don’t censor what they listen to I explain to them the lyrics and meaning and now they understand what is good music which requires talent to produce and what is trash with can be produce by untalented.

  • Msyatesjul09

    This is “insane” when you entertain this, it becomes you. Our kids are being fed this diet of poison, which is destined to get them a one way to prison.  One way they wont be returning.  We are a destructive race of people, we consume our own.

  • iTS Freeky!!!!!

    thats the reason u teach ur kids rite from wrong early…..u cant hold their hands thruoghout adulthood and decide what what they like…but u can set program them to set the trend and not to follow

  • Lori

    I went to a house party a few weeks ago and they had that type of music playing.  It made me cringe to think that so many of our people poison their mind with that awful music everyday.  It is a form of brainwashing-the way they repeat those words over and over like a mantra.  Our people are destroyed for a lack of knowledge.

  • http://www.facebook.com/BigBlackRod Roderick Bryant

    The folks who truly need to hear this don’t read Dr. Boyce; they’re on Bossip or Necole Bitchie, or on the corners…PEACE.

  • Drue

    I’ve listened to one Lil’ Wayne song and promised to never listen to one of his songs again.  I’m fourteen and raised with Christian principles.  It’s horrifying what he talks about.   I think he can rap, I can’t take that way from him, but I listen to rappers like:  Lecrae, Trip Lee, Tedashii, Pro, Da T.R.U.T.H., Flame, etc.  There’s tons of good music that isn’t derogatory.

  • Laughinatyou

    lmfao this is a pile of sh*t. 1.) it has nothing to do with a black/white thing. i love how f*cking idiots always turn it into a race thing. IT’S NOT. he has control of what he puts out, genius. if he didn’t want to say things like that, he wouldn’t. 2.) “goons” and “goblins” has nothing to do with a male/female relationship… smh… KNOW what you’re talking about next time you put out a stupid waste of space article like this.

  • Poopenhaufer

    All this Black vs. White power struggle is just teaching young blacks to grow up in a segregated mindset. We should all just stand united, all races UNITY!

  • Poopenhaufer

    All this Black vs. White power struggle is just teaching young blacks to grow up in a segregated mindset. We should all just stand united, all races UNITY!

  • mark e johnson

    the sad thing is that he does not realized that he is being used as well. maybe one day his dumb ass will wake up – but for him it will probably be too late.